Prairie Public

Indian Pride, Economic Development: Part 2

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JuniKae Randall conducts an interview with Lance Morgan, President/CEA of Ho Chunk, Inc. in Nebraska, and a member of the Winnebago tribe, about the impact of casinos and other gaming establishments on reservation economies and culture.

It's All Earth and Sky | Agriculture and Traditions

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Arthur Flegel tells of turkey red wheat, which created the Bread Basket of the World in the upper Plains, even with dry land farming. The homestead living arrangement versus the European village with outlying fields system was a difficult adjustment.

 

Indian Pride | Tribal Relations | Part 1

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This episode examines the relationship between Native American tribes and the United States federal government. Speakers discuss health care, justice systems, and business opportunities. Also discussed: religious artifacts in museums, gaming on reservations, and sovereignty.

Indian Pride, Gaming: Part 1

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Economic opportunities and other issues of Indian gaming are examined, featuring commentary by Sen. Ben Nighthorse Campbell, Northern Cheyenne Tribe, Montana; Joel Frank, Seminole Tribe of Florida; Harold "Gus" Frank, chairman of the Forest County Potawatomi, Wisconsin; Sen. Byron Dorgan (D-ND), Senate Indian Affairs Committee.

It's All Earth and Sky | The Horizontal World

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Debra Marquart talks of the role of Germans from Russia women in agriculture and the many labors involved in their lives.

“It’s all earth and sky!” was the reaction of one German-Russian immigrant when she arrived on the plains of the Upper Midwest. Like many others who came to the region seeking a land of promise and opportunity, she and her family endured – and prevailed – on this rich, expansive landscape. Immigration implies departure, as well as arrival. Transport from one country to another may mean deportation; it inescapably includes exile whether voluntary or forced, and brings disruption to families in the old country and in the new. Immigrants require courage and fortitude, even when they are weak and poor. Like many others who have come here, Germans from Russia have suffered, and they have overcome. Since their background and history is as rich in texture as it is in diversity, they serve here as a model of assimilation of other ethnic groups into Amer

Cotton Wood - Turkey of a Different Feather

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The bluegrass band, Cotton Wood, perform their song "Turkey of a Different Feather," a variation on the folk song "Turkey in the Straw."  After ten years together, all four original members still enjoy making music with each other and entertaining audiences.

Rivers, Roads, Rails, and Air | Water Communication

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Learn how rivers already provided an avenue for the movement of goods and people in 1803 when Lewis and Clark traveled up the Missouri River to look for a waterway to the West.

Water: The Lifeblood | Parallel Cooling System in a Thermoelectric Plant

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The Comanche Station in Pueblo, Colorado is finding technological ways to double their energy production without doubling their water usage. 

Water: The Lifeblood | Water Lubricates our Economy

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Just as oil, coal, and electricity propel our economy, so does water. As consumers increase their demand for power, companies and power plants will need to re-think how they use water and where it comes from.

New Cargo | Steamboats on the Red

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Learn how, beginning in the late 1880s and early 1900s, the cargo transported on the steamboats changed from buffalo robes and furs to hard spring wheat, in this video from the Steamboats on the Red series. As a result, grain elevators were built along the banks of the river, and farmers were able to get their crops to market fairly quickly.

Looking at the shallow twists and turns of the Red River, it’s hard to imagine that steam-powered paddlewheel boats were once the most important transportation link between St. Paul, Minnesota, and Winnipeg, Manitoba. From the first in 1859 to the last that sank in 1909, Red River steamboats hauled thousands of settlers and millions of tons of freight across the border between the United States and Canada. Although it lasted barely 50 years, the age of the steamboat forged a commercial network between the two countries that exists to this day in the Interstate-29 corridor.

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