Prairie Public

Mother Nature in Charge | Long Commutes

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Clarence Greene, roads superintendent for the Spirit Lake Reservation, has to drive great distances to get to job sites because roads are under several feet of water. He has seen many family farms flooded out, farms that have been passed from one generation to the next, leaving no legacy or livelihood for this generation.

Money Drives | Steamboats on the Red

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Find out why businessmen considered the Red River of the North a water highway in this video from the Steamboats on the Red series. The Red River of the North isn’t the first river that comes to mind when a person thinks of a water highway. So what could have possibly driven businessmen to think of it as such? Money. Money drove companies, like the Hudson’s Bay Company, to find a shorter and more economical route from New York to St. Paul, Minnesota. But as these businessmen would find out, nothing is ever as easy as it seems.

Looking at the shallow twists and turns of the Red River, it’s hard to imagine that steam-powered paddlewheel boats were once the most important transportation link between St. Paul, Minnesota, and Winnipeg, Manitoba. From the first in 1859 to the last that sank in 1909, Red River steamboats hauled thousands of settlers and millions of tons of freight across the border between the United States and Canada. Although it lasted barely 50 years, the age of the steamboat forged a commercial network between the two countries that exists to this day in the Interstate-29 corridor.

Indian Pride | Tribal Relations | Part 3

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Billy Daniels Jr. of Forest County Potawatomi, Wisconsin, tells his favorite story about the Sun and the Wind.

Germans from Russia in South America | Marriages and Weddings

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Learn about marriage traditions of German Russians living in South America. Marriages of Germans with Spanishes weren't allowed.

The Germans from Russia | Folk Traditions and Artwork

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Learn how the Germans from Russia are known for their Folk Healing Traditions, which are based on the practices of the Catholic Church. The German-Russians are also known for their weaving, which changed according to town and their intricate ironwork which can still be seen today on the prairie in many cemetaries. Intricate crosses brimming with lillies and roses in tribute to the dead will stand on the land for years to come.

Lewis and Clark Pathways | Fort Union

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Fort Union was a fur trading post along the Missouri River in what is now western North Dakota. European settlers and Native Americans both came and traded at this post with Its whitewashed walls seen for miles across the prairie. The river served as the transportation artery for the fort, whose daily life is now explained by living historians.

Lewis and Clark Pathways | The Mandan People

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Lewis and Clark carried out their plan to spend the winter along the Missouri River near the Mandan tribe. The Mandan culture was different than the nomadic Sioux, as they lived in earthlodges in fortified villages, gardened and traded extensively. The Mandan and Hidatsa traded corn for tools and battle axes made by the expedition’s blacksmith, allowing expedition members to survive the winter.

The Germans from Russia | Germans from Russia a Look Back

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Learn how the Germans from Russia's life in America has spanned two decades. They have lived through two World Wars where they have felt ashamed due to their accent and their heritage because they were thought of as the enemy. Today there are over 1,000,000 descendents of the Germans from Russia and over 30 percent of North Dakota is of German ancestery. For more information on the Germans from Russia and their families, you may contact the Germans from Russia Heritage collection in Bismarck, ND.

The Germans from Russia | Lifestyle in Russia and the Northern Prairies

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See how the Germans from Russia tried to establish the same kind of villages and lives they had back in Russia. Many of the villages were named after the first community leaders. Homes were built from sandstone, mud, and other materials indigenous to the area. Cellars were used everywhere to store vegetables until the next harvest. They tried to create "home" in America. It is said that American men do not cry, but men from the Germans from Russia background did, they cried for home. Their home-sickness caused a hole in their hearts.

Germans from Russia in South America | Role of Women

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Learn how the role of German Russian women expanded over the years.

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