WGBH

Rocket-Doodle-Doo

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In this video segment from Between the Lions, a guitar-playing robot and a kazoo-playing rooster play a song called "Rocket-Doodle-Doo." This catchy song features lots of rhymes, illustrates a strategy for teaching new vocabulary words, and its text can be used to build fluency in reading.

Daddy Long Legs, by Ted Kooser

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This video segment from Poetry Everywhere features Iowa-born poet Ted Kooser reading his poem "Daddy Long Legs" at the Dodge Poetry Festival. Ted Kooser has said, “I write for other people with the hope that I can help them to see the wonderful things within their everyday experiences. In short, I want to show people how interesting the ordinary world can be if you pay attention.” In this poem, a spider in the basement provides a window into the soul. A poet and an essayist, Ted Kooser spent 35 years in the insurance business, before devoting himself to writing.

For a biography of the poet Ted Kooser, please visit the Poetry Foundation Web site.

The Dancing, by Gerald Stern

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This video segment from Poetry Everywhere features the poet Gerald Stern reading his poem "The Dancing" at the Dodge Poetry Festival. A poetry reviewer once wrote about Gerald Stern that his poems “[reveal] his emotions while revealing almost nothing about their origins.” “The Dancing” is filled with emotions that build to a terrible climax—but why?

For a biography of the poet Gerald Stern, please visit the Poetry Foundation Web site.

Basic Black - Roslyn Brock, Chairman of the Board, NAACP

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Learn from NAACP Chairman Brock about how the group is "changing with the times" to include social media, in this video from Basic Black: Black Perspectives Now.

Fred Says: rocket

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In this video segment from Between the Lions, Fred Newman attaches sounds to the letters he sees, gradually forming the word "rocket." First, he notices the letter "r," articulating the /r/ sound. Then he tackles "ock." He blends these parts together to make “rock." Finally, he notices the letters "et" and adds their sounds at the end of “rock," blending until the word, “rocket," takes off!

Facing It, by Yusef Komunyakaa

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Fourteen years after the Vietnam War, veteran and contemporary poet Yusef Komunyakaa wrote about facing the Vietnam Veteran's Memorial wall and the memories and images the wall evoked. In this video segment from Poetry Everywhere, Komunyakaa reads his poem, "Facing It" at the Dodge Poetry Festival.

Read "Facing It" at the Poetry Foundation.

Why Are Your Poems So Dark?, by Linda Pastan

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This video segment from Poetry Everywhere features Bronx born poet Linda Pastan reading her poem "Why Are Your Poems So Dark?" at the Dodge Poetry Festival. Linda Pastan’s poems use very simple language and plain statements to describe everyday situations—visiting a museum, taking care of children, listening to a message on an answering machine. But she ends up uncovering the dark worries and threats that hide just below that quiet surface of daily life.

For a biography of the poet Linda Pastan please visit the Poetry Foundation Web site.

Basic Black - Blogging While Brown

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Learn about the rapid increase in the number of bloggers of color, in this video from Basic Black: Black Perspectives Now.

Poem: Tuning Up

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This video segment from Between the Lions features an animated poem about tuning instruments. Various instruments are introduced by their sounds and by how they are played. A young girl plays some of them. The words of the poem are displayed with the animation. Featured vocabulary includes: concert, tuba, bassoon, violin, cymbal, trumpet, flutist, flutes, drummer, drums, cello, and baton. This video segment provides a resource for Fluency, Vocabulary, Language and Vocabulary Development, and Phonological Awareness.

Lake Echo, Dear, by C. D. Wright

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This video segment from Poetry Everywhere features the poet C. D. Wright reads her poem “Lake Echo, Dear” at the Dodge Poetry Festival. Born in the Ozark Mountains of Arkansas in 1949, Wright has developed a style of poetry all her own—both experimental and Southern, implicit in its lyrical utterance and yet grounded in an inherent sense of the unutterable.

For a biography of the poet C. D. Wright please visit the Poetry Foundation Web site.

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