WGBH

Basic Black - Rev. Jonathan Walton on Civil Rights

Icon: 
Streaming icon

As a minister and professor at Harvard University, Walton discusses how King's prophetic message inspires each generation to care for its community, in this video from Basic Black: Black Perspectives Now.

Mother's Day, by Daisy Zamora

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This video segment from Poetry Everywhere features native Nicaraguan poet Daisy Zamora reading her poem "Mother’s Day" at the Dodge Poetry Festival. In politics, Daisy Zamora fought for equality and justice by opposing the dictator Somosa in her native Nicaragua, a stance that led to her banishment until the dictator was overthrown. In poetry, Zamora fights for equality and justice by opposing the norms that are dictated to women by society.

Brian, Age 7, by Mark Doty

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This video segment from Poetry Everywhere features poet Mark Doty reading his poem "Brian, Age 7" at the Dodge Poetry Festival. Mark Doty’s poems are often about feeling haunted, by people who have died, or places that have been left behind. In “Brian, Age 7”, the poet is moved by the drawing of a boy he has never met, and whose drawing is soon a memory that might be forgotten unless a poem makes it forever memorable.

For a biography of the poet Mark Doty, please visit the Poetry Foundation Web site.

The Wild Old Wicked Man, by William Butler Yeats

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This video segment from Poetry Everywhere features jazz musician Wynton Marsalis reading the poem "The Wild Old Wicked Man" written by his favorite poet William Butler Yeats. Yeats was the most respected of all Irish poets by the time he reached old age. Throughout his career he avoided the “low” subject matter of many other Irish poets, focusing on classical allusions and themes. But in his old age, he found a voice for the lowly thoughts and emotions inside himself—the Wild Old Wicked Man.

For a biography of the poet William Butler Yeats please visit the Poetry Foundation Web site.

Basic Black - President Obama Rallies Massachusetts Voters

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Learn about voters' reactions to Obama's first-term economic accomplishments, in this video from Basic Black: Black Perspectives Now.

For What Binds Us, by Jane Hirshfield

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This video segment from Poetry Everywhere features the poet Jane Hirshfield reading her poem "For What Binds Us" at the Dodge Poetry Festival. What does it mean to have a relationship over time? Jane Hirshfield wonders in her poetry about different kinds of bonds between people, some of which we cannot anticipate. How much we can really help each other, even the ones we love? How does time change relationships and heal wounds?

For a biography of the poet Jane Hirshfield please visit the Poetry Foundation Web site.

American Wedding, by Joseph Millar

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This video segment from Poetry Everywhere features the poet Joseph Millar reading his poem “American Wedding” at the Dodge Poetry Festival. A father watches his daughter at her wedding, and is filled with mixed emotions. He is proud of her, he loves her, he knows she is happy and in love, but he can’t help feeling the precariousness of her situation as she prepares to embark on adult life.

For a biography of the poet Joseph Millar, please visit the Poetry Foundation Web site.

After Making Love We Hear Footsteps, by Galway Kinnell

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This video segment from Poetry Everywhere features the poet Galway Kinnell reading his poem “After Making Love We Hear Footsteps” at the Dodge Poetry Festival. Rhode Island-born Kinnell’s poetry shows the power of love and spirituality flowing through the small moments and interactions of everyday life.

For a biography of the poet Galway Kinnell, please visit the Poetry Foundation Web site.

Basic Black - Lee Daniels, Director of "Precious"

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Learn about this filmmaker's perspectives on cinema and race in America, in this video from Basic Black: Black Perspectives Now.

The Floral Apron, by Marilyn Chin

Icon: 
Streaming icon

“What is the loss of country if it were not the loss of self?” This is the question Marilyn Chin asks in much of her poetry. This video segment from Poetry Everywhere features Chin, at the Dodge Poetry Festival, reading her poem “The Floral Apron” in which an immigrant woman keeps Chinese tradition alive in America, for the next generation, and for herself, but is she doing the right thing?

For a biography of the poet Marilyn Chin please visit the Poetry Foundation Web site.

Pages