WNET

Estimating Costs, Estimating Profits

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In this video segment from TV411, Franklin works with Laverne to create a budget and understand his pay for a job painting a room. Franklin is not sure if he should take on a job where he will be paid $250 for painting a friend’s family room. He must take into consideration the cost of supplies as well as how long the job will take him. He consults with Laverne and realizes he has to make some estimates to come up with the budget for the job.

Strange Fruit: A Song Born of Protest

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This video segment explores how the song Strange Fruit became one of the best known and most enduring songs of protest. In 1939, the legendary blues singer Billie Holiday performed the song as a daring criticism of the commonplace practice of the lynching of African-Americans. Civil rights groups such as the NAACP had made countless appeals, but it was Holiday’s haunting rendition that made it impossible for white Americans and lawmakers to ignore the widespread crime.

Literary Elements and Techniques | Setting

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Explore how authors use setting to establish the time, place, and social conditions in which a story takes place in this short animated video from WNET.

Marshall's View of Federalism

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The Founding Fathers reasoned that in creating a new nation there could be two distinct branches of government with overlapping powers: that of the individual states and that of a federal government. This video presents the evolution of John Marshall’s ideas about the importance of federal authority from his time as a soldier in the Revolutionary War to his tenure as the first Chief Justice of the Supreme Court.

The Rochons: An African American Dynasty

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In this video from Finding Your Roots, host Henry Louis Gates Jr. reveals the ancestry of White House Senior Advisor Valerie Jarrett. Jarrett learns she is descended from one of the first African American legislators in the country and that she comes from a line of free people of color dating back to the 1700s.

Great Migration | The African Americans

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This video from The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross explores the Great Migration and the idea that the Emancipation Proclamation did not live up to its promises.

The Cairo Genizah

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In this video from the PBS series The Story of the Jews, Simon Schama explores the singular medieval phenomenon known as the Cairo Genizah, a repository of some 300,000 ancient documents preserved in a hole in the wall in a synagogue in Cairo. From approximately 1000-1500 AD, the Jews of Cairo deposited a wide assortment of documents, from sacred to secular, ancient bible texts to shopping lists, unwittingly creating a time capsule that offers modern man an unprecedented look at medieval life not only for the Jews, but for their Muslim neighbors as well.

Rising Negrophobia and Challenging the Lie

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This video from The Rise and Fall of Jim Crow features historians Mark Bauerlein and Kenneth Goings addressing the notion of “negrophobia,” an attitude engendering a fear or contempt for black people and their culture that was pervasive throughout the Jim Crow era. During this period, racist imagery of African Americans in the media and in advertising often presented people of color as criminals, less than human, and with exaggerated, unnatural features. These images not only objectified African Americans but helped to cement the perception (by whites) that African Americans were inferior. Despite the contributions African Americans made to Jazz music and other emerging arts forms in the early 20th century that challenged the pervading notion of black inferiority, African Americans endured centuries of institutionalized racism that permeated all parts of American society.

Images of African Americans | The African Americans

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This video from The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross examines the ways in which pro-slavery proponents defended slavery and explores how negative perceptions of African Americans are perpetuated.

Supporting the Women of Afghanistan

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This video from Women, War & Peace highlights the continued struggle of women in Afghanistan to be included in the peace and rebuilding process. Though the United Nations made an international stipulation that women must be included in any conflict resolution, women are barely involved in such processes. However, Afghan women will continue to fight—they fear their rights will be sacrificed in Afghanistan’s struggle for peace, and they believe their presence at peace talks is crucial to rebuild a sustaining peace.

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