WNET

Time for School | Kenya: Joab

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In this media gallery meet Joab, a first-grader in a school in Kenya. There are 74 children in his class and only one teacher. Students sit on mats instead of chairs with desks, not only because desks are too expensive but also so that more children can fit into the classroom. Follow Joab over 12 years as he struggles to get an education in the face of abject poverty. Check out the entire collection of resources from the documentary "Time For School" here.

Looking for Lincoln | Abraham Lincoln's Words

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In this video segment, from the PBS documentary Looking for Lincoln, Professor Henry Louis Gates, Jr. cites several of Lincoln's most famous lines of oratory from different points in his political career, noting the "seemingly simple but profoundly eloquent language" he used "to express and ennoble his cause."

The Cutting Room Floor

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This video demystifies the film editing process as producers and editors discuss edits to the documentary American Masters: Bill T. Jones: A Good Man. The film chronicles Bill T. Jones creating Fondly Do We Hope, Fervently Do We Pray, a dance performance commemorating Abraham Lincoln’s 200th birthday. As the post-production process evolves, the filmmakers confront the same challenge Jones faced: should they include a reference to "snakes in bed," a metaphor Lincoln used to illustrate his views on slavery in the new territories, or should it end up on the cutting room floor.

The Smoking Section

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States across the United States are beginning to ban smoking in public places to protect people from the hazards of second-hand smoke. This video segment from New York Voices looks at the battle over fresh air in bars and restaurants. Multiple perspectives are presented. Smokers debate it should be their choice to smoke or not smoke. Some resent being told they cannot smoke. On the other hand, nonsmokers are bothered by the smoke and risk the dangers of inhaling second-hand smoke.

Ndakinna Wilderness Project | WILD TV

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The Ndakinna Wilderness Project focuses on wilderness skills, animal tracking, wilderness survival, native storytelling and culture, and nature awareness. In this video segment from WILD TV, a guide describes how to camouflage a person's body to avoid being detected in the wilderness. A group of young people camouflage themselves so they can get close enough to the animals to observe their natural behaviors.

Documenting Change in Plants

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In this New York Voices segment, learn how plants can be used to help us learn about climate changes over time. For example, a warming trend can be determined by looking at samples that flower earlier and earlier each year. Scientists also conduct research on plants to find genes that are important for agriculture, food and medicine.

Nature | Crash: A Tale of Two Species - Protecting the Horseshoe Crab

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The decline of the red knot, a bird that depends upon on the eggs of horseshoe crabs for its survival, recently lead scientists to discover that the crabs numbers were also seriously in decline. In the 1990's, fishermen found that horseshoe crabs served as good bait. They were easy to catch, and they were free. With no regulation in place, fishermen indiscriminately captured crabs, endangering them to the point of a 75% reduction in the horseshoe crab population.

Ronald Johnson of Sapelo Island

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This video segment from Egg: The Arts Show presents a glimpse of the last island-based Gullah/Geechee community located on Sapelo Island.The original Gullah/Geechee people were slaves. When slavery was abolished, the island was abandoned to the slaves. Ronald Johnson of the Sapelo Island Cultural and Revitalization Society speaks of his pride for the island community and the importance of preserving the Gullah/Geechee culture. A festival is held each year to bring people to the island to learn about the culture and foster interest in preserving the culture. For more about Sapelo Island, see "Ben Hall of Sapelo Island" and "Frankie Quimby of Sapelo Island".

Looking for Lincoln | Was Lincoln a White Supremacist?

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Henry Louis Gates, Jr. deconstructs the traditional, legendary narrative of Abraham Lincoln in this segment from the PBS documentary Looking for Lincoln. Writer Lerone Bennett, Jr. recalls his disillusionment with "The Great Emancipator" who'd been his childhood hero, citing Lincoln's proposed "compromise" solution to slavery (which had involved the deportation of slaves to colonies in Panama and Liberia) and Lincoln's failure to contribute anything to the Abolitionist cause prior to the Civil War. Historian David Blight, however, reminds us that it is our own task to define "what is worth remembering" about Lincoln's story.

What Does He Have to Say to Us Today?

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In this video segment from the documentary American Masters: Bill T. Jones: A Good Man, Bill T. Jones and his Associate Artistic Director, Janet Wong, turn to primary texts to learn more about Abraham Lincoln. In an effort to make Lincoln relevant in the performance piece, Jones and Wong begin their research but along the way discover surprising attitudes, ideas and statements reflective of the controversies that exist around Lincoln today.

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