WNET

City Horses Part I

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When you think of horses you don’t usually think of the city, but in this segment from Wild TV, Carolyne DeGrammont tells us about the Cedar Lane Stables in Queens, one of the five boroughs of New York City. People with different levels of skills with horses as well as people from all disciplines and backgrounds come to the stables. For Carolyne, going to the stables helps her find relief from the stresses of her fast-paced day. She can forget all of her troubles and feel happy. The atmosphere helps her feel connected to nature, too.

Looking for Lincoln | The Gettysburg Address

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An excerpt from the PBS series Looking for Lincoln, in which President Bill Clinton explains the context of Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address and Professor Henry Louis Gates, Jr. examines its content.

Bodies Move

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In this video from the documentary American Masters: Bill T. Jones: A Good Man, the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company has been commissioned by the Ravinia Festival in Chicago to create a dance performance celebrating the 200th anniversary of the birth of Abraham Lincoln. While Bill T. Jones decides that Paul, a dancer within the ensemble, will represent the “dancing” body of Lincoln, he also ponders an approach to the development of the performance piece as a non-narrative series of ideas.

War Was In The Air | Women, War, and Peace

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This video from Women War & Peace delves into the unraveling of ethnic relationships in Yugoslavia in the early 1990s. "Witness 99" and "Z.R.," residents of the Bosnian town of Foca, discuss their lives before the war—when people didn’t care about ethnic lines, and everyone lived a happy and peaceful life. In the early 1990s, however, the growth of national separatist movements created divisions within the country. Ultimately, a Serb-led war broke out.

Jarrod Studies Birds

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Jarrod Santora, professor at the College of Staten Island, is an ornithologist, a person who studies birds. In this segment from WILD TV, Jarrod describes his job. One of his responsibilities is to "band" or identify birds by putting a small bracelet around the birds' legs. Jarrod gets up before sunrise and spreads nets along bushes to safely catch birds. To get birds to go into the net, sometimes he will call them with whistles and noises, such as a screeching owl noise. Once birds are caught in the nets, he can carefully free them and band their legs. For more about the study of birds see, "An Ornithologist's Job".

Pesky Critters

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Changes in the Florida wetlands affect the native alligators' habitats. As humans develop Florida and fill in wetlands to build homes and commercial properties, alligators have nowhere to go. In this video segment from WILD TV, Todd Hardwick has a business called Pesky Critters. He goes to houses to remove alligators who invade homes and other spaces humans inhabit. We see him answer a call from a homeowner who saw an alligator near his pool. The alligator is caught and later returned to the wild.

Nature | Springs Eternal: Florida's Fountain of Youth - Red Tide

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This video from Nature addresses red tide and the major threat it poses to the health of Florida’s springs and wildlife. In Florida, a disproportionate share of ground water is used to support agricultural businesses that raise crops, develop land, and cultivate golf courses, each depending on the use of nitrate-based fertilizers. Red tide occurs when the used water returns to the underground aquifers, triggering an outbreak of algae which in turn produces an abundant quantity of toxins.

Hiawatha | Weston Woods

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This Weston Woods segment is from the book Hiawatha, illustrated by Susan Jeffers, based upon Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's epic poem, "The Song of Hiawatha." Longfellow's poem was published in 1855. An epic poem is a lengthy narrative that includes heroic deeds that had a great impact on a culture. In this case, the poem is about the stories of many Native American Indian tribes, especially the Ojibway Indians of Michigan, Wisconsin and Minnesota. This video segment is about a Native American named Hiawatha and his grandmother, Nokomis. As a young boy, Hiawatha learns about all the animals in the forest.

Dance Theatre of Harlem

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This video segment from A Walk Through Harlem features Arthur Mitchell, the artistic director and former dancer who founded the Dance Theatre of Harlem.  In 1968, the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King had a profound impact upon Miller who decided to return to his old neighborhood to teach dance, thinking the discipline, focus and technique would energize African American children in their everyday lives. Often considered to be an excellent classical ballet dancer, Mitchell was also thought of as an exception to the rule. He believed, however, given the opportunity, African American dancers could also excel in classical ballet. The school now has more than 1000 young people of diverse ethnic backgrounds and cultures.

A Community of People Now | American Masters: Bill T. Jones: A Good Man

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In this segment from the documentary American Masters: Bill T. Jones: A Good Man, the creative process continues for the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company in the creation of a dance-theater piece about Abraham Lincoln. Bill T. Jones notes the current trend of artists creating work independent of the restrictions of previous generations. In an effort to advance the performance while mirroring the trend, Jones decides to take away some of the focus from the Lincoln family story to include the personal stories of dancers within the company.

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