African American History

Forward, 54th! (2013)

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Written and directed by Mary Hall Surface, the play Forward, 54th! was commissioned by the National Gallery of Art in 2013 in honor of the exhibition Tell It with Pride: The 54th Massachusetts Regiment and Augustus Saint-Gaudens' Shaw Memorial. The Gallery staged 24 performances between September 2013 and March 2014.

Grade Level: 
Middle
Length: 
00:32
Forward, 54th!

American Archaeology Uncovers the Underground Railroad

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American archaeologists uncover information about an "early underground railroad" which brought African-American slaves from the South to the North for safety and new freedom. Also includes persons who were part of this movement like Harriet Tubman, and Henry Ward Beecher, and members of churches.

American Archaeology Uncovers the Underground Railroad

Mission US: Flight to Freedom

In Mission 2: “Flight to Freedom,” players take on the role of Lucy, a 14-year-old slave in Kentucky. As they navigate her escape and journey to Ohio, they discover that life in the “free” North is dangerous and difficult. In 1850, the Fugitive Slave Act brings disaster. Will Lucy ever truly be free?

Atlanta Compromise Speech

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Speech given by Booker T. Washington at the Cotton States and International Exposition in Atlanta in September 1895.

Moses: When Harriet Tubman Led Her People to Freedom

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Copies: 1

In lyrical text, Carole Boston Weatherford describes Tubman's spiritual journey as she hears the voice of God guiding her North to freedom on her very first trip to escape the brutal practice of forced servitude. Tubman, courageous, compassionate and deeply religious, would take 19 subsequent trips back South, never being caught, but none as profound as this first. Harriet Tubman's bravery and relentless pursuit of freedom are a testament to the resilience of the human spirit. This is a unique and moving protrait of one of the most inspiring figures of the Underground Railroad.

Lexile: 
AD660L

Rosa

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Copies: 1

An inspiring account of an event that shaped American history

Fifty years after her refusal to give up her seat on a Montgomery, Alabama, city bus, Mrs. Rosa Parks is still one of the most important figures in the American civil rights movement. This picture- book tribute to Mrs. Parks is a celebration of her courageous action and the events that followed.

Award-winning poet, writer, and activist Nikki Giovanni's evocative text combines with Bryan Collier's striking cut-paper images to retell the story of this historic event from a wholly unique and original perspective.

Lexile: 
900L

Martin's Big Words

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Copies: 1

This picture book biography of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Brings his life and the profound nature of his message to young children through his own words. Martin Luther King, Jr. , Was one of the most influential and gifted speakers of all time. Doreen Rappaport uses quotes from some of his most beloved speeches to tell the story of his life and his work in a simple, direct way. Bryan Collier's stunning collage art combines remarkable watercolor paintings with vibrant patterns and textures. A timeline and a lsit of additional books and web sites help make this a standout biography of Dr.

Lexile: 
AD410L

Duke Ellington

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Copies: 1

Edward Kennedy "Duke" Ellington, "King of the Keys," was born on April 29, 1899, in Washington, D.C. "He was a smooth-talkin', slick-steppin', piano-playin' kid," writes master wordsmith Andrea Pinkney in the rhythmic, fluid, swinging prose of this excellent biography for early readers. It was ragtime music that first "set Duke's fingers to wiggling." He got back to work and taught himself to "press on the pearlies." Soon 19-year-old Duke was playing compositions "smoother than a hairdo sleeked with pomade" at parties, pool halls, country clubs, and cabarets. Skipping from D.C.

Lexile: 
AD800L

Freedom: The Underground Railroad

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Early in the history of the United States, slavery was an institution that seemed unmovable but with efforts of men and women across the country, it was toppled.

Grade Level: 
Middle
High
Content Area: 
Social Studies
Play Time: 
120 min.
Freedom: The Underground Railroad