American Revolution

Should 12-Year-Olds Be Allowed to Vote? | America From Scratch

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Voting age takes on new relevance today as young people across the country are making their voices heard in the wake of the Stoneman Douglas High School shooting earlier this year. Washington, D.C., is on track to lower the voting age to 16.

Revisiting Minnesota State Rep. Phyllis Kahn’s decades-long fight to expand voting rights to young people, this episode explores who has historically had voting rights in the U.S. and how the overall trend toward greater access may continue into the future.

Where US Politics Came From | Crash Course US History #9

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John Green teaches you where American politicians come from. In the beginning, George Washington was elected president with no opposition, everything was new and exciting, and everyone just got along. For several months. Then the contentious debate about the nature of the United States began, and it continues to this day. Washington and his lackey/handler Alexander Hamilton pursued an elitist program of federalism. The opposition, creatively known as the anti-federalists, wanted to build some kind of agrarian pseudo-paradise where every (white) man could have his own farm, and live a free, self-reliant life. The founding father who epitomized this view was Thomas Jefferson.

Mumbet

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In this segment from the PBS series Finding Your Roots, the story of Mumbet, is told. Mumbet was a female slave who, after hearing the Declaration of Independence read, decided to seek her own freedom. Kyra Sedgwick's ancestor, Theodore Sedgwick, served as Mumbet's lawyer and helped her ultimately win her freedom.

Mercantilism and the American Revolution

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In this video from Finding Your Roots, Tina Fey learns about an ancestor who helped Benjamin Franklin develop the manufacturing industry in the American colonies. The background essay and discussion questions help students understand British mercantilism and its effects on colonial politics.   

106: First Century of Statehood, Part I (Georgia and the American Revolution) | Georgia Stories

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Segments: The Big Question, Savannah Under Attack, and The Nancy Hart Story.

Evolution of Transportation

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Did you know that, at one time, New York State was considered by many to be the "hub" for the transportation revolution in the United States? Learn more in this video from Regents Review 2.0.

Nancy Hart: Rebel Heroine | Georgia Stories

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Have you ever played the parlor game of “telephone” where a phrase is whispered and passed along from person to person? When the final person states it aloud there is generally much laughter since it rarely matches the original phrase. The Nancy Hart story may be a great example of that old game. This reenactment of her well-known encounter with Tories and their fate shows how legends grow and change over time.

Magna Carta: Justification for American Independence

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Explore how the principles of Magna Carta inspired American colonists to declare their independence from England in this video from the James Otis Lecture Series, presented by the Massachusetts Chapter of the American Board of Trial Advocates. This resources is part of the James Otis Lecture Series Collection.

A New Birth of Freedom: Black Soldiers in the Civil War | Georgia Stories

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Black Americans had a point to prove, and during the Civil War they did. First they fought for the right to fight when many whites did not want them to take up arms, and then they fought and died for a cause bigger than themselves. Within the Union ranks were 200,000 black soldiers–nearly 10 percent of the Union’s 2 million troops. One of the most famous companies of black soldiers was the 54th Massachusetts Colored Infantry.

Party Systems | Crash Course Government and Politics

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Throughout most of the United States history, our political system has been dominated by a two-party system, but the policies and groups that support these parties have changed over time. There have been five, arguably six, party systems since the election of John Adams in 1796, (George Washington's presidency was an unusual case, and weÍll get to that), and we'll look at the supporters, and policies, of each during these eras.

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