American Revolution

Dr. Craik, George Washington's Doctor | In Their Own Words

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Dr. Craik discusses George Washington's bravery, leadership, and ingenuity. He describes how General Washington used the science of medicine to help win the Revolutionary War.

The Seven Years War and the Great Awakening | Crash Course US History #5

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John Green teaches you about the beginnings of the American Revolution in a video titled The Seven Years War. Confusing? Maybe. John argues that the Seven Years War, which is often called the French and Indian War in the US, laid a lot of the groundwork for the Revolution. Other stuff was going on in the colonies in the 18th century that primed the people for revolution. One was the Great Awakening. Religious revival was sweeping the country, introducing new ideas about religion and how it should be practiced. At the same time thinkers like John Locke were rethinking the relationship between rulers and the ruled. So in this highly charged atmosphere, you can just imagine what would happen if the crown started trying to exert more control over the colonies.

War Descends Upon Kentucky

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The Shawnee raided the settlements in Kentucky in 1776 and 1777; they even captured Daniel Boone’s daughter, Jemima, and two of her friends. After being captured by the Shawnee then being adopted by them, Daniel Boone escaped and traveled 160 miles in four days to warn Boonesborough of an impending attack. The Shawnee arrived at Boonesborough in September 1778, and conducted the longest siege of any fort on the Kentucky frontier, but they ultimately retreated.

Daniel Goff: Revolutionary Soldier

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Daniel Goff was among the free African Americans who fought in the Revolutionary War. Goff served under George Washington at Valley Forge and fought in the Battle of Monmouth. After the war, Goff lived in Boone County, Kentucky, and worked on a local farm. Goff died in 1843, and a marker was placed to honor him in 2018.

Tea, Taxes, and The American Revolution | Crash Course World History

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John Green teaches you about the American Revolution and the American Revolutionary War, which it turns out were two different things. John goes over the issues and events that precipitated rebellion in Britain's American colonies, and he also explores the ideas that laid the groundwork for the new American democracy. Find out how the tax bill from the Seven Years War fomented an uprising, how the Enlightenment influenced the Founding Fathers, and who were the winners and losers in this conflict (hint: many of the people living in the Colonies ended up losers). The Revolution purportedly brought freedom and equality to the Thirteen Colonies, but they weren't equally distributed. Also, you'll learn about America's love affair with commemorative ceramics and what happens when rich white guys take the reins from rich white guys, and put together a society of, by, and for rich white guys.

Invasion of Kentucky

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In response to atrocities committed by an invasion force of British and Native American tribes at Ruddle’s and Martin’s Stations in June 1780, George Rogers Clark led an expedition to destroy the Shawnee towns in Ohio. Daniel Boone later becomes a delegate to the Virginia legislature.

Harry Washington | The African Americans

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This video from The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross describes the life of Harry Washington, a slave owned by George Washington at the beginning of the American Revolution. Sensing that the talk of liberty and independence was not meant for slaves, Harry Washington joined the Loyalist regiment, the Black Pioneers, along with 20,000 slaves who decided to fight for the British.

Who Won the American Revolution | Crash Course US History #7

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John Green teaches you about the American Revolution. John will teach you about the major battles of the war, and discuss the strategies on both sides. Everyone is familiar with how this war played out for the Founding Fathers; they got to become the Founding Fathers. But what did the revolution mean to the common people in the United States? For white, property-owning males, it was pretty sweet. They gained rights that were a definite step up from being British Colonial citizens. For everyone else, the short-term gains were not clear. Women's rights were unaffected, and slaves remained in slavery. As for poor white folks, they remained poor and disenfranchised. The reality is it took a long time for this whole democracy thing to get underway, and the principles of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness weren't immediately available to all these newly minted Americans.

The Terrible Battle of Blue Licks

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After the siege of Bryan Station in mid-August 1782, Daniel Boone, commanding one of three divisions of Kentucky riflemen, followed the Native American invasion force as it withdrew toward the Ohio River. The Kentuckians marched toward the Native American force at Blue Licks and were horribly defeated. Boone’s son, Israel, and his nephew, Thomas Boone, were killed. Blue Licks was the bloodiest engagement on the Kentucky frontier and one of the last battles of the American Revolution.

Mordecai Sheftall - Colonial Hero | Georgia Stories

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When the British attacked Savannah, Mordecai Sheftall was captured in a skirmish when he refused to abandon his son. Marion Levy Mendel, a Sheftall descendant, describes the capture. Threatened with "skivvering", he refused to reveal where patriot supplies were hidden. Sheftall was imprisoned, escaped, and recaptured. He was eventually pardoned and remained a patriot throughout.

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