Civics and Government

Creating the Woman Suffrage Ballet, 72 Steps

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Nashville Ballet Artistic Director Paul Vasterling, Choreographer Gina Patterson, and Composer Jordan Brook Hamlin discuss their creative process and how to tell historical stories through the performing arts.

72 Steps, commissioned by the League of Women Voters of Nashville and performed by NB2, Nashville Ballet’s second company, commemorates the ratification of the 19th Amendment granting women the right to vote. As the final state to ratify the 19th Amendment, Tennessee played a vital role in giving women the right vote.

Mueller Makes Statement to Say Report Doesn’t Clear Trump | PBS NewsHour

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Summary: Attorney General William Barr’s summary of the Mueller report says there is insufficient evidence that President Donald Trump or his campaign colluded with Russia during the 2016 election. In response, the White House claimed victory, while Democrats insist the full report be made public. After weeks, a redacted version was made public here. For weeks, the only document that had been released to the public was Barr’s four-page synthesis of Mueller’s report. Trump sent out a list of Democrats who claimed there was evidence that he colluded with Russia, insisting they be held accountable. Meanwhile, Democrats point out that although Trump wasn’t charged with obstruction, he also wasn’t exonerated. To learn more what American voters think about the Mueller report, read this article by the Associated Press.

on May 30, Special counsel Robert Mueller broke his silence about his office’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. In a nine-minute statement, he reiterated that Justice Department policy prohibits charging a sitting president with a crime, and that his report did not clear President Trump of committing a crime. Judy Woodruff reports.

May 30, 2019 video and resource materials from PBS NewsHour.

Check out our Daily News Story collection, or find more at PBS NewsHour Extra.

Cedar Trees and Totem Poles of Pacific Northwest Native Americans | Native America: Nature to Nations

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Learn about the spiritual relationship between the Native American people of the Pacific Northwest and the cedar tree. Students will gain an understanding of the spiritual connection between the cedar tree and the people. Students will also examine the potlatch ceremony of the Kwakwaka'wakw tribe is similar to political elections in the way they celebrate leadership and provide a path to the future.

Youth Vote in America | PBS NewsHour

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Directions: Read the video summary, and, if time permits, read through the recent findings of the Harvard Institute of Politics poll on the youth vote (summary included in support materials). Watch the video above from the NewsHour’s youth journalism program, Student Reporting Labs and follow up with the discussion questions included in support materials.

Summary: Why do young people hold some of the lowest voter turnout levels in the U.S.? Is it really their fault? And why might the 2018 elections see some record-breaking turnout among younger voters? Teen reporters from NewsHour Student Reporting Labs (SRL) reveal the issues that matter most to young voters in the new series, Turning Out: The Youth Vote. From Miami, Florida to Fort Payne, Alabama, student journalists from SRL’s national network of 135 schools conducted more than 300 interviews to explore the impact of the youth vote. According to a new poll from the Institute of Politics at the Harvard Kennedy School, young people, 18-29, could turn out to vote in the 2018 election in record numbers. Why do you think that’s the case? Read the study or a summary of its findings below. 

November 1, 2018 video and resource materials from PBS NewsHour.

Check out our Daily News Story collection, or find more at PBS NewsHour Extra.

Film Clip 4 | The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution

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In this excerpt from The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution, we meet some of the women in the Black Panther Party, who did everything from fielding phone calls to delivering speeches. While the central image of the Panthers may be of males in jackets holding guns, the majority of its rank and file members were women who struggled to overcome chauvinism.

American Military Forces Help Rebuild Afghanistan | Iowa Soldiers Remember Afghanistan

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When U.S. troops were deployed to Afghanistan, the country was war-torn and shattered due to many years of conflict. Along with winning the hearts and trust of the Afghan people, American forces were tasked with helping to repair damaged infrastructure.

Should We Have Mandatory Military Service? | America From Scratch

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The U.S. has a long history of warfare—but, over time, our country's population with military experience has dwindled. More than 60 other countries require their adult citizens to serve. If the U.S. were to start over today, would we make it a requirement? Host Toussaint Morrison explores the different ways young adults in the U.S. could serve their country if service became mandatory.

Federal Policy Changes (17) | 1980s Farm Crisis

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New agricultural policy is developed and existing policy changed during the 1980s in reaction to the farm crisis. This segment is part of the documentary The Farm Crisis, which examines the tragic circumstances faced by farmers for most of the 1980s, when thousands were forced into bankruptcy, land values dropped by one-third nationally, and sky-high interest rates turned successes into failures seemingly overnight.

The Constitution, the Articles, and Federalism | Crash Course US History #8

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John Green teaches you about the United States Constitution. During and after the American Revolutionary War, the government of the new country operated under the Articles of Confederation. While these Articles got the young nation through its war with England, they weren't of much use when it came to running a country. So, the founding fathers decided to try their hand at nation-building, and they created the Constitution of the United States, which you may remember as the one that says We The People at the top. You'll learn about Shays' Rebellion, the Federalist Papers, the elite vs rabble dynamic of the houses of congress, and start to find out just what an anti-federalist is.

Who Won the American Revolution | Crash Course US History #7

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John Green teaches you about the American Revolution. John will teach you about the major battles of the war, and discuss the strategies on both sides. Everyone is familiar with how this war played out for the Founding Fathers; they got to become the Founding Fathers. But what did the revolution mean to the common people in the United States? For white, property-owning males, it was pretty sweet. They gained rights that were a definite step up from being British Colonial citizens. For everyone else, the short-term gains were not clear. Women's rights were unaffected, and slaves remained in slavery. As for poor white folks, they remained poor and disenfranchised. The reality is it took a long time for this whole democracy thing to get underway, and the principles of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness weren't immediately available to all these newly minted Americans.

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