Data

Response to Instruction and Intervention (RTI²)

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Response to Instruction and Intervention (RTI²) is a three-tiered approach to student learning that is focused on prevention and early intervention. RTI² uses assessment for instruction, intervention, and transition between these tiers for K-12 students as they develop skills in reading, reading comprehension, reading fluency, mathematics calculation, mathematics problem solving, and written expression. Learn more about RTI² and its implementation from experts at the Tennessee Department of Education.

Intro To Infographics: Behind The Scenes Of Unlocked

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SHOW, DON’T TELL. That’s the general idea of infographics, which use visuals to make numbers/stats/processes easier to understand. While it’s easy to enjoy a well crafted infographic, creating one can be challenging. What type of visual fits your data? How should you style your graphic? What tools can you use to create infographics without starting from scratch?

Making an infographic is a multistep process, so we’ll break this tutorial into two parts. In this lesson, we’ll walk you through the basics of making your own infographic, depending on the data at hand.

Assessing Teaching and Learning

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In this professional development video from Getting Results, Dr. John Bransford, professor of education at the University of Washington School of Education, as well as a community college statistics instructor and a course designer discuss assessment. Bransford explains that learning goals should include not only what is to be learned, but also how students will demonstrate knowledge and how they can be assessed throughout the course. The instructor is shown using questioning strategies to gauge her students’ learning. She explains that she measures her success as an instructor by that of her students. Bransford concludes, saying that the more knowledge teachers have, the more removed their level of understanding might be from that of their students. For this reason, building in assessments throughout the course, to monitor student understanding, helps improve instruction.

Utilizing Right and Wrong Answers

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In this professional development video excerpted from Getting Results, a community college instructor explains how he reviews a test with his students by having his students work in groups to discuss answers. The instructor explains that while tests can reveal to him what hasn't been grasped, this group review helps his students reflect on the rationale behind each answer. In addition, the tests help him discover whether goals are met, whether there are other benefits to the lesson, and whether he was successful in teaching the lesson. Once he has discovered the answers to these questions, he can decide whether to adjust the course design.

50 Years Later, is Head Start Still Necessary?

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Learn about the history behind Head Start and how the program has evolved with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from May 18, 2015.

The Secret Lives of Hackers

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Learn about different types of hackers with this video from the NOVA Cybersecurity Lab. Hacking is solving problems in creative or unexpected ways. Hacks have been used for everything from Galileo’s telescope to Apollo 13. Similarly, there are many reasons that people hack computers. Some are just curious about how systems work, others hack to find and fix security flaws before they are exploited by criminals. Some hackers have bad intentions fueled by greed, attention, or rebellion. There are some hackers who have good intentions, but use questionable methods of getting information. “Hacking” isn’t good or bad – it depends on how and why people hack.

NOVA: Using Quantum Physics to Prevent Voter Fraud

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Learn how quantum physics is used to secure electronic communications and could be applied to electronic voting systems, in this video from NOVA Digital. Information that is transmitted electronically—like an email, text, or electronic vote—is protected by encryption. Quantum mechanics offers two methods of encryption. The first involves generating and distributing an encryption key using quantum particles such as photons. If a hacker intercepts this key, the quantum particles will be affected and the recipient will know the encryption is compromised. The second method relies on a process known as quantum teleportation—quantum-entangled particles transmit information instantly between them even at a distance. This resource is part of the NOVA: Web-Original Collection.

Natural Language Processing: Crash Course Computer Science #36

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As computers play an increasing role in our daily lives there has been a growing demand for voice user interfaces, but speech is also terribly complicated. Vocabularies are diverse, sentence structures can often dictate the meaning of certain words, and computers also have to deal with accents, mispronunciations, and many common linguistic faux pas.

Cyber Codes

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Learn how encryption keeps online information private in this video from the NOVA Cybersecurity Lab. Your messages are coded by email programs and websites to prevent others from reading them. Codes have been used in messages for centuries.  Caesar sent coded messages to his military in ancient Rome. In the 1940s, the Allied forces cracked the German Enigma Code, saving lives during World War II. Today, emails are protected through public-key cryptography, which uses numbers from both the sending and receiving email servers to create a key. However, not all online activity is encrypted and in some cases your browsing history, text messages, and data from apps can be intercepted.

Memory & Storage: Crash Course Computer Science #19

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So, we’ve talked about computer memory a couple times in this series, but what we haven’t talked about is storage. Data written to storage, like your hard drive, is a little different, because it will still be there even if the power goes out - this is known as non-volatile memory. Today we’re going to trace the history of these storage technologies from punch cards, delay line memory, core memory, magnetic tape, and magnetic drums, to floppy disks, hard disk drives, cds, and solid state drives. Initially, volatile memory, like RAM was much faster than these non-volatile storage memories, but that distinction is becoming less and less true today.

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