Digital Literacy

Is the Internet Making You Meaner? | Above the Noise

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If the Internet's making you feel meaner, you're not imagining it. People really do act differently online than they do in person. Here’s why. According to a paper published in 2004 by psychologist John Suler, there are about 6 main reasons people act differently online. This could explain the rise of internet trolls or why people open up more online than they would in person. 

Have your students watch the video and respond to the question in KQED Learn.

Made in collaboration with Common Sense. 

Screen Time: How Much Is Too Much? | Above the Noise

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Even by conservative estimates, the average American spends over 6 hours per day staring at a screen. That’s a lot of time. What does the scientific research say about it? Is it good or bad for us? Co-produced with Common Sense Education. 

Have your students watch the video and respond to the question in KQED Learn.

When Is Your Brain Ready for Social Media? | Above the Noise

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Social media is a mixed bag. Being online may increase chances of identity theft and cyberbullying, yet, it’s estimated over 20% of 8-12-year-olds have at least one social media account—sometimes without their parents’ knowledge. At times, tweens are taking back charge of their brand, started by their parents since they were born, and sometimes, they are looking to share and connect with a community they have trouble finding face-to-face. So, What’s the right age to start using social media? 

Have your students watch the video and respond to the question in KQED Learn.

YouTube Algorithms: How to Avoid the Rabbit Hole | Above the Noise

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We all know how easy it is to spend hours watching videos on YouTube. Why do we go down that rabbit hole? Mostly because of a combination of computer programming and marketing know-how called ALGORITHMS. Co-produced with Data & Society Research Institute. 

Have your students watch the video and respond to the question in KQED Learn.

Deepfakes: Can You Spot a Phony Video? | Above the Noise

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Recently, a doctored video of Speaker Nancy Pelosi got millions of views on social media. Deepfakes are becoming easier to make and spread, and Above the Noise is here to help people understand this new phenomenon and what to do about it. 

Have your students watch the video and respond to the question in KQED Learn.

 

 

Why Do Our Brains Love Fake News? | Above the Noise

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Ever have an argument with someone, and no matter how many facts you provide, you just can’t get that person to see it your way? One big reason for this is cognitive bias, which is a limitation in our thinking that can cause flaws in our judgement. Confirmation bias is a specific type of cognitive bias that motivates us to seek out information we already believe and ignore or minimize facts that threaten what we believe. Studies show that when people are presented with facts that contradict what they believe, the parts of the brain that control reason and rationality go inactive. But, the parts of the brain that process emotion light up like the Fourth of July. In this video, host Myles Bess dives into the research and offers some tips to combat confirmation bias. This resource is part of the News and Media Literacy Collection.

Who's Snooping on You Online? | Above the Noise

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With recent reports of high profile data breaches, ransomware attacks and the prevalence of online trackers -- it’s hard to know how best to protect your privacy online. In this Above the Noise video we met up with the cybersecurity experts at Electronic Frontier Foundation to learn more about who’s snooping on us online and what we can do to protect ourselves. 

Digital Smarts: Behaving Ethically Online (2012)

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Cyber ethics and respect for others online are critical skills to acquire for today’s connected teens. The message of this teen-centered video is that all students have a responsibility to behave ethically online and to know how to react when others behave in inappropriate ways.

Grade Level: 
Middle
High
Length: 
00:17
Digital Smarts: Behaving Ethically Online