disasters

National Fire Prevention Week | All About the Holidays

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Held during the week around October 9th, National Fire Prevention Week reminds Americans of the danger of fire and the importance of fire safety. Families can use it as a time to review their fire safety plan and learn more about properly using fire.

John Snow: Pioneer of Epidemiology

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In this video segment adapted from Rx for Survival, actors portray how John Snow, a London physician, traced a major outbreak of cholera in the 1850s to its source. Using logic, statistics, and mapping, Snow rejected the idea that cholera was carried in a cloud of bad air. Instead, he believed contaminated water was responsible for spreading the disease among the local population. Snow’s surveillance and response tactics would become a foundation of modern epidemiology—the science of public health that is built on a working knowledge of probability, statistics, and sound research methods. This resource is part of the Environmental Public Health collection.

Out of Proportion

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Students are asked to explain how natural disasters affect environmental health. Science Now! video writing prompts are tools for educators and students to use in the classroom to encourage creative writing. The topics covered in these clips are a variety of science related information bits that challenge a student to interpret what they see. Presented by WLVT PBS 39 and PSEA.

Survivors of Typhoon Haiyan Face Desperate Conditions | PBS Newshour

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Survivors of Typhoon Haiyan are returning to flattened communities with no food, water or sanitation, as officials struggle to provide relief. This Daily News Story from PBS NewsHour Extra was created on November 12th, 2013.

Health Risks of the BP Oil Spill

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In this video segment adapted from Need to Know, meet a fisherman who became a cleanup worker on the 2010 BP oil spill and then developed health problems. Learn about concern over the health and safety of cleanup workers because of the amount of oil and dispersant they were exposed to and the duration of exposure. Hear about how hazardous hydrocarbons reached the surface of the water and got into the air. Learn about common symptoms associated with exposure to crude oil and chemical dispersant; in addition, hear concerns about the chemicals ending up in the food chain and the unknown long-term health risks that this may pose.

West Nile Virus Outbreak in NYC

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This video segment adapted from Rx for Survival follows Tracey McNamara, lead pathologist at the Bronx Zoo, and her work to explain why crows in New York City were literally falling dead from the sky during one summer. McNamara traced the cause of the mystery illness to a mosquito-borne virus, and then suggested a possible link between the animal illness and an ongoing outbreak of human illness. In the end, McNamara was proven correct: it turned out that the same virus—West Nile virus—was infecting both birds and humans.

How Big Is the Oil Spill?

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In this video adapted from Need to Know, artist Steve Brodner uses simple drawings to compare the size of the 2010 BP oil spill to more familiar things, like a football field, a shopping mall, the state of Texas, and Earth’s moon.

Three Mile Island Cooling Towers

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In this Building Block video from Frontline: Nuclear Reaction, the four cooling towers at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant dot the horizon at sunrise. Smoke billows from the two towers on the left. The Susquehanna River lies in the foreground.

Apocalypse How (2009)

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Conspiracy theorists insist the apocalypse will arrive in 2012, based on the predictions of ancient Mayan astronomers. But no matter what year it is, the question remains: How will it happen? Will the apocalypse come from the earth's core, the skies, or the depths of space? Could the end of all life on Earth begin with a rogue asteroid or gamma rays from nearby stars?

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High
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01:28
Apocalypse How

1906 San Francisco Earthquake

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Copies: 1

A huge earthquake rocked the West Coast on April 18, 1906. Worst hit was the city of San Francisco, where buildings collapsed and fires raged for days. Thousands of people died, and many more were left homeless. The disaster was just one of a long series of earthquakes triggered by the San Andreas Fault. It taught scientists valuable lessons about preparing for earthquakes.

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