Discrimination

Deviance on Stage | The Nance

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Watch this scene from The Nance in which the characters argue about decency laws restricting freedom of expression in the theater in 1930s New York City. Nathan Lane stars in this ensemble production as Chauncey Miles, a homosexual actor working in the burlesque theater district. In this excerpt, the characters discuss Mayor Fiorello La Guardia's efforts to shut down burlesque shows.

The Art of Double Entendre | The Nance

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Watch as actor Nathan Lane defends burlesque comedy performances before a judge in this excerpt from the play The Nance. Lane's character, Chauncey Miles, tries to explain to the court what the term "double entendre" means and why it's funny to audiences. Chauncey is on trial for violating decency laws in the theater in 1930s New York City.

Depression Politics | The Nance

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Actor Nathan Lane stars in this production of The Nance, a play set in the 1930s that addresses discrimination against homosexuals within the theater community of New York City. An ensemble cast argues about the merits of Communism, human rights, and left-wing politics in this excerpt from the play.

Protest | The Nance

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Watch as the characters unionize and prepare to protest the censorship of 1930s burlesque shows in this excerpt from The Nance starring Nathan Lane. Under the leadership of Mayor La Guardia, police cracked down on burlesque performers in the 1930s, accusing them of violating decency laws. This comedic play dramatizes the discrimination of homosexuals and other performers in the burlesque theater scene of the era.

The Raid | The Nance

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Chauncey Miles, a homosexual burlesque performer, explains to his roommate that the theater was raided by police for violating decency laws in this excerpt from the play The Nance. In this comedic scene, Chauncey mocks the trumped-up charges while Ned tries to understand what laws were broken.

Black Like Me (2012)

Icon: 
DVD icon

In 1964, just as Washington was passing the Civil Rights Act, some of Hollywood's most passionate activists interpreted John Howard Griffin's brave chronicle Black Like Me for the screen, with James Whitmore starring as the writer, who, in 1959, medically altered his pigment and, with the help of a sunlamp, reinvented himself as an itinerant black writer navigating his

Grade Level: 
Middle
High
Length: 
1964
Black Like Me

Althea Gibson TIME Magazine Cover

Icon: 
Web resource icon

Althea Gibson TIME Magazine Cover

H.R. 4130 (112th): Althea Gibson Excellence Act

Icon: 
Web resource icon

A bill proposed to award posthumously a Congressional Gold Medal to Althea Gibson, in recognition of her ground breaking achievements in athletics and her commitment to ending racial discrimination and prejudice within the world of athletics.