Drugs

Michael | Not Broken

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Michael faces the truth as he shares his story of self-medicating with drugs.

This video segment is part of Not Broken, a candid and hopeful documentary about seven young people fighting to live their dreams despite their mental health challenges, produced by Arizona Public Media.

Fighting the Opioid Epidemic with Harm Reduction Strategies | Addiction

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Learn how harm reduction strategies are used to treat people suffering from opioid addiction and consider how public health approaches can improve current treatments, in this video from NOVA: Addiction. This video follows a doctor who volunteers for a harm reduction program that offers its patients a life-saving drug to be taken in case of an overdose, free hepatitis and HIV testing, and needle exchange. The program’s primary goal is to stop preventable deaths and new disease outbreaks. This type of intervention reflects an approach favored by some public health and medical experts to end the opioid and other drug-use epidemics by understanding addiction as a disease rather than as a stigmatized or criminal behavior.

One Decision | Understanding Opioid Addiction

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This documentary, created by an Eagle Scout candidate, examines opioid addiction from the viewpoint of health professionals, two recovering addicts, and the parent of an addict.

Should the Olympics Just Allow Doping? | Braincraft

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Is it time to allow performance enhancing drugs in professional sports? A look at the science and ethics of doping in the lead up to the Rio 2016 Olympic Games.

What Are the Effects of Opioid Addiction on Young People? | PBS NewsHour

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Teachers and students: Watch this PBS NewsHour Facebook Live recorded on Wed., October 11th on how schools are teaching students about opioid addiction.

Starting in the 1990s, chronic pain patients were given high levels of synthetic opiates to relieve pain. Some patients misused the painkillers, while others became addicted. In the 2010s, individuals who became addicted to painkillers turned to heroin after state governments started to clamp down on the number of prescriptions physicians could write. Currently, about 33,000 people die each year from opiate-based prescription drugs and heroin overdose in the U.S. Young people are at high risk of addiction and overdose. Recovery high schools are growing in popularity because many addiction treatment programs do not accept teenagers. There are currently about 40 recovery high schools across the U.S.

October 10, 2017 video and resource materials from PBS NewsHour.

Politicians Struggle with Opioid Epidemic in New Hampshire | PBS NewsHour

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Find out why politicians campaigning in New Hampshire are focusing on drug abuse with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from January 6, 2016.

Media Literacy | the.News

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Listen as Antonio Neves reports on the portrayal of drug usage in popular media, and hear from experts on the importance of being media literate. Discover that drugs can affect higher-order thinking by damaging the frontal lobes in the brain. Learn how to analyze mixed messages in the media about drug usage in popular culture.

Why Are Drugs So Hard to Quit?

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An animated video from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) which explains addiction in simple terms. Quitting drugs is hard because addiction is a brain disease. Your brain is like a control tower that sends out signals to direct your actions and choices. Addiction changes the signals in your brain and makes it hard to feel OK without the drug. Watch the video for a visualization of these concepts and for information on how to get yourself or a loved one help.

Indiana Hopes Needle Exchange will Help Stem HIV Epidemic

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Learn how an Indiana county is dealing with an outbreak of HIV with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from May 1, 2015.

Hooked Rx: From Prescription to Addiction

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“Hooked Rx: From Prescription to Addiction” is a special investigative project on the destructive epidemic of opioid addiction, produced by advanced journalism students at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication. 

For about four months, dozens of students throughout the school crisscrossed the state to produce a multimedia investigation into Arizona’s—and the country’s—dependence on prescription pain medication and the toll addiction takes on families and patients. The project includes: 

● A 30-minute investigative documentary to be aired Jan. 10 by every Arizona television station and most of the state’s radio outlets. The broadcast was shot and reported by a team of students led by chief videographer Sean Logan under the direction of Cronkite professor Jacquee Petchel. Assistant Dean Mark Lodato and Cronkite News television production manager Jim Jacoby assisted in production. 

● More than two dozen stories, graphics and videos on "Hooked Rx: From Prescription to Addiction." Cronkite News digital reporters, led by professor of practice Christina Leonard and students in Petchel’s Depth Reporting class, produced the digital content focusing on doctors, addicts, rehabilitation, pills and taking action. 

● Cronkite News digital production and social media students, led by professors of practice Rebecca Blatt and Jessica Pucci and student Hope Flores, put the website together, and developed and executed the social media plan. Cronkite News developer Bhuvan Aggarwal designed and built the website.

 ● 360-degree video produced by students in the New Media Innovation and Entrepreneurship Lab, led by professor of practice Retha Hill.

 ● The Public Insight Network, directed by Theresa Poulson, found sources throughout Arizona who were willing to share their stories with reporters.

 ● Communications students in the Cronkite Public Relations Lab, under the direction of professor of practice Mark Hass and Sonia Bovio, developed a strategic communication plan and organized an advocacy campaign designed to inform young people on campus and across the state about the dangers of opioid abuse.

 ● Hospital emergency department data was obtained from the Arizona Department of Health Services and analyzed by Professor and Knight Chair in Journalism Steve Doig.

“Hooked Rx” follows in the footsteps of the award-winning "Hooked: Tracking Heroin’s Hold on Arizona," a 2015 documentary that was also broadcast on all Arizona television stations. It was awarded the prestigious Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and launched a nationwide campaign by the National Association of Broadcasters to combat opioid abuse.

 - Kevin Dale, executive editor, Cronkite News at Arizona PBS

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