Ecology

Homo Sapiens Versus Neanderthals

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Explore the origins of modern humans. Fossil evidence from Middle East caves and elsewhere has revealed some competitive advantages modern humans, known as Homo sapiens, are believed to have held over the more archaic human species, Neanderthals. For example, during the time in which the two species may have coexisted, Homo sapiens lived on high ground, from which they could survey the landscape and plan their hunting expeditions. Some scientists have theorized that the success of this strategy may have contributed to the demise of the valley-dwelling Neanderthals, who became extinct about 30,000 years ago. Adapted from NOVA.

This video is available in both English and Spanish audio, along with corresponding closed captions.

Paws for a Minute | River Otter

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Learn about the river otter—where they live in the wild, features of their habitat, and how their specific physical features and feeding behaviors help them survive. (This original, one-minute video was produced by Rhode Island PBS, in association with Roger Williams Park Zoo in Providence, Rhode Island.)

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Hide and Seek: Predator versus Prey Relations | Wild Kratts

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The Kratt brothers watch out for each other in the quest to discover the identity of the mystery lizard. While using their creature powers, they run into predators along the way - including hungry road runners and a quick coyote!

Turtle-Backed Tour of the Reef | Wild Kratts

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Come learn about sea turtles with the Wild Kratts gang. The gang tries to uncover the secrets of the sea turtle's swimming action in order to give the Tortuga swimming powers.

River Rewilding: Advanced Water Quality

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In this unit, students will consider what actions can be taken to reduce human impacts on local streams and improve stream quality. This Advanced Water Quality unit is packaged into three smaller parts: Part 1: Stream Habitat Assessment; Part 2: Macroinvertebrate Analysis, and Part 3: Macroinvertebrate Design Challenge.

The activities and lessons in each part have been developed to build upon one another, but they can also stand alone. Done in conjunction, students will experience analyzing and interpreting the biotic and abiotic factors in streams and designing and testing a macroinvertebrate sampler that mimics their stream’s habitat.

Saving Engeldinger Marsh | Iowa Land and Sky

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Environmental conservation is a never-ending mission to save and restore irreplaceable natural environments. Located in central Iowa, Engeldinger Marsh is one of the state’s few remaining untouched marshes and is known as one of Iowa's biggest conservation victories when the state reconsidered building a road through the land. 

 

Paws for a Minute | Armadillo

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Learn about armadillos — where they live in the wild, features of their habitat, and how their specific physical features and feeding behaviors help them to survive. (This original, one-minute video is produced by Rhode Island PBS, in association with Roger Williams Park Zoo in Providence, Rhode Island.)

Find more Paws for a Minute videos in our Collection.

Up the Food Chain | Wild Kratts

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Learn about food chains in the wild with the Wild Kratts. The gang discusses the food chain, starting at the bottom with producers and going up to consumers.

Gila Monster on the Move! | Wild Kratts

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Chris, Martin, and Xavier observe a gila monster on the hunt for its spring feast. These creatures only need to eat three meals like this in a year!

Bayou Bartholomew: World's Longest Bayou

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Originating near Pine Bluff in Arkansas, Bayou Bartholomew has the unique distinction of being the longest bayou in the world. It stretches over 350 miles before emptying into the Ouachita River near Sterlington, LA. Bayou Bartholomew is not only a wonder of nature, but also a national treasure. It's one of the most diverse streams in North America and is home to hundreds of species of aquatic life as well as other forms of wildlife that make their homes on the bayou. Learn through personal accounts about life on and the history of the Bayou from those whose lives are intertwined with it, how it has changed through time, and the efforts to restore it to its former glory.

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