Economics

Hot Shots & Hot Jobs: Software Engineers Create Solutions through Code

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Just about everything you can do on a computer—checking your email, posting to Facebook, online banking and shopping—is powered by software. The people who come up with that software, and keep it working efficiently, are behind the scenes of a big portion of our lives.

"Getting to Work" at Holland 1916 | American Graduate

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Holland 1916 is a North Kansas City, Missouri manufacturing company with a history that dates back to the earliest years of the 20th century. But it has not shied away from a new approach to recruiting employees and preparing the workforce of tomorrow. 

The company regularly hosts fourth-graders at its Burlington Street headquarters to illustrate the real-world applications of math. 

“Business is the primary consumer of what educators are producing — students,” CEO Mike Stradinger said. “So we need to be involved in the process, and we have for too long been silent.” 

That epiphany came at Holland 1916, Stradinger said, when the company experienced problems with the quantity and quality of available workers. 

“Manufacturing, like most businesses, is a people game,” Stradinger said, “and if we don’t have great people, we are not going to be a great company.” 

Holland 1916’s initial education foray came about five years ago with high school students. But after feedback from teachers, the company decided to catch kids as early as possible. They landed on fourth-graders because that is when they learn division. 

But partnering with education is not without its difficulties, Stradinger said, and that’s mainly because business operates at a very different pace. 

“Our customers are constantly giving us feedback: we want it faster, we want it to do this, we want it to be less expensive,” Stradinger said. 

But to educators, even annual changes can feel disruptive. “And trying to get those two to work together,” he said. “You have to overcome that challenge.”

 

The American Dream | Segment 5

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Thomas J. Watson is named the richest CEO in America in 1935. He is considered the first 'celebrity CEO.'

What Are Risks and Benefits to Commodity Trading? | Ask the Analysts

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What are risks and benefits to commodity trading?  Experienced commodity market analysts provide thoughtful insight on trading skills, price trends, and strategies to help students better understand how the markets work.

Short-Lived Agriculture Boom Leads to the Crisis (5) | 1980s Farm Crisis

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Extensive land loans, high land prices, and low interest rates combine in the 1970s to build the short-lived agricultural boom. This segment is part of the documentary The Farm Crisis, which examines the tragic circumstances faced by farmers for most of the 1980s, when thousands were forced into bankruptcy, land values dropped by one-third nationally, and sky-high interest rates turned successes into failures seemingly overnight.

Caleb Pollard: President/Co-Founder of Scratchtown Brewery | What If – Innovator Insights

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NOTE: Spanish version is captions only.

Caleb Pollard opened Scratchtown Brewing Company in Ord, NE in 2013. Ord is a rural community of 2,000 on the edge of Nebraska’s Sandhills. Scratchtown is dedicated to brewing and serving an assortment of premium-quality handcrafted beer. Scratchtown Brewery’s  beer is made with some of the freshest, purest water on the planet – drawn from the Ogalala aquifer.

Innovation Insights features short video interviews with innovators and creators answering questions about things like influences, passions, and mistakes, and offering advice for the next generation of innovators.

The Reagan Revolution | Crash Course US History #43

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In which John Green teaches you about what is often called the Reagan Era. John will teach you about Reagan's election victory over the hapless Jimmy Carter, tax cuts, Reagan's Economic Bill of Rights, union busting, and the Iran-Contra scandal among other things. Learn about Reagan's domestic and foreign policy initiatives, and even a little about Bonzo the Chimp.

The Origin of Banking

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This segment from the PBS documentary The Ascent of Money looks at early Renaissance Italy, when credit came of age, and explores how money lending became the foundation of a new kind of power. Against the backdrop of the powerful Medici family, historian Niall Ferguson describes how credit became a legitimate international business and led to the birth of modern banking.

Hacking Your Brain to Get Out of Debt | Two Cents

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Debt is one of our least favorite things to talk about, and that's one of the main reasons it is so hard to pay off. BUT researchers have figured out how to rewire your brain to take on the debt monster.

Pickle Business | Wide Angle

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Years ago, as an eighth grader, Fatma Nator was forced to end her formal education and focus on her domestic education. It was both forms of education, however, that provided Fatma with the background she needed to become the marketing director of the pickle business that she and other Palestinian widows established. In this video segment from the Wide Angle film "Pickles, Inc.," learn about Fatma and her role in merchandising her company’s products.

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