Elementary Social Studies

Iowa's Geological Diversity | Iowa Land and Sky

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Take a short visual tour of Iowa's geological diversity, featuring unique geological features in each of Iowa's landform regions across the state.

The Haudenosaunee Legendary Founding | Native America

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The Hiawatha wampum belt tells the story of the Haudenosaunee Confederacy’s legendary founding and Wampum’s power to heal. In this sacred story, a warrior named Hiawatha who meets a prophet called the Peacemaker and becomes his student. Hiawatha pays the price for this alliance: the evil warlord, Tadodaho, takes his daughters in retaliation. Hiawatha is incredibly sad and finds solace in white shells, called Wampum. The ritual of healing with Wampum, called a Condolence Ceremony, is still practiced by Haudenosaunee today.

Along their journey together, Hiawatha and the Peacemaker meet with the chiefs of the Oneida, Cayuga, Mohawk, and Seneca, unifying the nations into a single Grand Council. The Onondaga, led by the evil Tadodaho, refuse to join. Clan mother Jigonsaseh helps Tadodaho accept the message of peace, bringing unity to the five nations. The Seneca, Cayuga, Onondaga, Oneida and Mohawk weave their single Wampum strands into one belt, bury their weapons of war beneath a large Tree or Peace, so ending a period of conflict. 

 

Gustavo's Story: Undocumented Status | The Graduates Film Module

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This film module spotlights Gustavo's story, and how he is working to overcome the barriers to education caused by his undocumented status. Students will see how undocumented immigrant status can create an obstacle to social and academic success.

KidVision | Pioneer Days

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Miss Penny and the KidVision Kids visit The Old Davie School History Museum. They learn how pioneer children lived, worked, and played! They sweep, pump water, wash clothes, make butter, write with an ink dip pen and played musical chairs. See how things a hundred years ago were different and the same. 

Fall Line | Physical Features of Georgia

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Learn about Georgia’s Fall Line, a natural barrier that separates the Piedmont and Coastal Plain regions. 

Know Ohio | Cool Digs

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Learn about the work of archeologists as they uncover an approximately 4000 year old homestead near Sheffield, Ohio. Then, travel south to Chillicothe to overview the prehistoric Adena Indian Mounds, and the Adena Smoking pipe which was named the official Ohio artifact in 2013.

Jazz: Contemporary Music Performance

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Listen to a contemporary performance of "Stand By Me" by Marcus Johnson and the Bay City Brass Band. This presentation was filmed at the Alabama Department of Archives and History as part of the ArchiTreats lecture series.

The Bozeman Trail | Native American History

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Learn about the Native American tribes that lived on the land through which the Bozeman Trail passed and the impact the Trail and Westward Expansion had on their way of life. 

Creating Meaningful Watershed Experiences

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This unit (found in the Facilitator Guide under the Support Materials tab) is intended to provide students with a Meaningful Watershed Educational Experience (MWEE) centered on the Great Lakes Watershed. By the end of the unit, students will implement a stewardship project within their community and will have a better understanding of their role in the Great Lakes Ecosystem.

These units guide students through the four stages of a Meaningful Watershed Educational Experience. The sequence of a MWEE, outlined by the NOAA Bay Watershed Education and Training (B-WET) Program, is:

1. Issue definition and background research

2. Outdoor field activities

3. Stewardship action projects

4. Synthesis and conclusions

This unit has an emphasis on the four major focus areas of the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI) Action Plan:

1. Cleaning up Great Lakes Areas of Concern

2. Preventing and controlling invasive species

3. Reducing nutrient runoff that contributes to harmful/nuisance algal blooms

4. Restoring habitat to protect native species

Cahokia’s Celestial Alignment | Native America: Cities of the Sky

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Cahokia was a Native American city that existed from about 1050-1350. The Mississippi mound civilization shared the same cosmological beliefs as the great ancient cities of Central and South America, and at its peak covered about six square miles and included over one hundred mounds. Those living in Cahokia held a fundamental understanding of the cosmos and aligning to it. But Cahokia’s city grid was 5 degrees precisely off the north-south axis, and did not align with the sun or moon’s movements. Why is this? Archaeologist Tim Pauketat explains the reason, revealing impressive rigor in city-planning.

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