environment

Teen Fights for Toxic Waste Cleanup

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New York student Shadia Wood tells how she became an environmental activist in this video adapted from Earth Island Institute’s New Leaders Initiative. Wood lives near several toxic waste sites and was concerned to learn that the New York Superfund—the money set aside for cleaning such sites in her state—had gone bankrupt. Working with other students and environmental groups, Wood lobbied the New York legislature for eight years until the Superfund program was refinanced. Environmentalist Laura Haight says that this law was the most important environmental law passed in New York State in a decade.

Becoming Green Energy Experts

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This Michigan State University/Lansing Boys and Girls Club partnership demonstrates the powerful result of giving youth the science background and tools they need to carry out investigations of their own design, and to communicate their knowledge in their own voice.

Drought and Famine | Crash Course World History

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Join host John Green to learn about drought, which is a natural weather phenomenon, and famine, which is almost always the result of human activity. Throughout human history, when food shortages hit humanity, there was food around. There was just a failure to connect people with the food that would keep them alive. There are a lot of reasons that food distribution breaks down, and John is going to teach you about them in the context of the late-19th century famines that struck British India.

The Great Exhibition | Victoria, Season 3

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Explore the landmark event that came to symbolize the Victorian era, the 1851 Great Exhibition in London, in this media gallery from the 2019 series Victoria, Season 3 | MASTERPIECE. Despite the surrounding controversy, the success of this international exhibit of the world’s greatest mechanical, scientific, and artistic accomplishments—in the midst of the Industrial Revolution—helped solidify Britain’s image as the leader of 19th-century Europe. It also elevated the popularity of Prince Albert, who championed the exhibit, as well as Queen Victoria.

Aquifer-In-A-Cup

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This series of video vignettes, brought to us by the Spokane Joint Aquifer Board and produced by KSPS Public Television, helps young learners understand what an aquifer is, the process of retrieving water from the aquifer, and ways to protect and preserve the aquifer.

The Spokane Valley Rathdrum Prairie Aquifer

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KSPS Public Television has joined with the Idaho Washington Aquifer Collaborative to help educate residents in the Inland Northwest about the importance of protecting their sole source of drinking water—the Spokane Valley Rathdrum Prairie Aquifer.

This collection of videos provides an overview and exploration of the Spokane Valley Rathdrum Prairie aquifer, its importance to the Inland Northwest, how it works, how it can be damaged, and simple actions residents can take to protect and preserve the water from the aquifer.

How ISIS Steals Oil to Stay in Power

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Hear about ISIS's multi-million dollar oil siphoning operation with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from October 18, 2015.

Great Elephant Census Underway in Africa

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Go inside the fight to preserve the elephant population in Africa with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from January 18, 2015.

Food Justice

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Urban high school students discuss problems in food systems and what can be done about them in this adaptation of a video they created in collaboration with the Environmental Justice League of Rhode Island. They discuss lack of access to fresh fruits and vegetables in urban areas; the high cost of healthy food compared to cheap and abundant junk food; the lack of food grown locally; and animal cruelty. The students offer solutions to these problems, such as urban gardening, buying local food at farmers markets, composting, recycling, and tree planting.

Malaria Treatment and Prevention Strategies

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This video segment adapted from Rx for Survival examines malaria in sub-Saharan Africa, a disease that kills more than one million children there each year. It explains how a deadly parasite, a member of the genus Plasmodium, enters the bloodstream via a mosquito bite and how it multiplies once inside host red blood cells. The video reveals that drug counterfeiting has increased malaria's death toll, and that newer drugs, while more effective than older ones, are too expensive for most Africans to acquire. The video also highlights one simple and low-cost solution—bed nets—that can be used to combat disease transmission.

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