environment

Aquifer-In-A-Cup

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This series of video vignettes, brought to us by the Spokane Joint Aquifer Board and produced by KSPS Public Television, helps young learners understand what an aquifer is, the process of retrieving water from the aquifer, and ways to protect and preserve the aquifer.

The Spokane Valley Rathdrum Prairie Aquifer

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KSPS Public Television has joined with the Idaho Washington Aquifer Collaborative to help educate residents in the Inland Northwest about the importance of protecting their sole source of drinking water—the Spokane Valley Rathdrum Prairie Aquifer.

This collection of videos provides an overview and exploration of the Spokane Valley Rathdrum Prairie aquifer, its importance to the Inland Northwest, how it works, how it can be damaged, and simple actions residents can take to protect and preserve the water from the aquifer.

Drought and Famine | Crash Course World History

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Join host John Green to learn about drought, which is a natural weather phenomenon, and famine, which is almost always the result of human activity. Throughout human history, when food shortages hit humanity, there was food around. There was just a failure to connect people with the food that would keep them alive. There are a lot of reasons that food distribution breaks down, and John is going to teach you about them in the context of the late-19th century famines that struck British India.

The Great Exhibition | Victoria, Season 3

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Explore the landmark event that came to symbolize the Victorian era, the 1851 Great Exhibition in London, in this media gallery from the 2019 series Victoria, Season 3 | MASTERPIECE. Despite the surrounding controversy, the success of this international exhibit of the world’s greatest mechanical, scientific, and artistic accomplishments—in the midst of the Industrial Revolution—helped solidify Britain’s image as the leader of 19th-century Europe. It also elevated the popularity of Prince Albert, who championed the exhibit, as well as Queen Victoria.

How ISIS Steals Oil to Stay in Power

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Hear about ISIS's multi-million dollar oil siphoning operation with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from October 18, 2015.

Great Elephant Census Underway in Africa

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Go inside the fight to preserve the elephant population in Africa with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from January 18, 2015.

Three Mile Island Cooling Towers

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In this Building Block video from Frontline: Nuclear Reaction, the four cooling towers at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant dot the horizon at sunrise. Smoke billows from the two towers on the left. The Susquehanna River lies in the foreground.

Greater Boston | Can Organic Farms and Mosquito Control Coexist?

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This video segment from Greater Boston examines the issue of spraying pesticides to combat disease-carrying insects. Massachusetts had been planning to use aerial spraying to control the spread of eastern equine encephalitis, a disease spread by mosquitoes. Ron Maribett, an organic farmer, said that if the state sprayed pesticides it would harm his business. The state said it would avoid spraying organic farms, but Maribett would have to bring livestock inside for 48 hours and avoid harvesting crops for two days. Another resident of the area believed that the spraying was necessary, but that farmers should be compensated for any losses.

New Contaminants in the Water Supply

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This video segment adapted from FRONTLINE: "Poisoned Waters" explains how the Potomac River, like many others, serves as both a drinking water supply and a dumping ground for wastewater. With proper processing, this system works well. However, water treatment removes only known contaminants; there is a growing concern about "new contaminants," chemicals in the water that are still unregulated but could cause harm to humans and animals.

PCB Cleanup in Seattle

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The PCB cleanup of South Park, a Seattle neighborhood along the Duwamish River is discussed in this video segment adapted from FRONTLINE: Poisoned Waters. In 2004, the community learned that some of its streets and yards were contaminated with toxic chemicals called PCBs. Citizens, galvanized by the finding, demanded the long-promised cleanup of an abandoned asphalt plant. The proposed cleanup led to a debate, when the Port of Seattle promised to reduce PCBs to the EPA standard of 25 parts per million (ppm), but residents demanded a stricter standard of 1 ppm. After debate, the city agreed to the stricter standard.

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