environment

How ISIS Steals Oil to Stay in Power

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Hear about ISIS's multi-million dollar oil siphoning operation with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from October 18, 2015.

Great Elephant Census Underway in Africa

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Go inside the fight to preserve the elephant population in Africa with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from January 18, 2015.

Clean Water Systems in Mexico

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In this video segment adapted from Rx for Survival, learn about the importance of clean water and sanitation systems. Hear the story of how, in the early 1990s, Mexico's entry into a North American trade agreement was threatened by a cholera epidemic. Find out how the Mexican government rebuilt the water and sanitation system to stop the spread of the disease and how the investment in clean water helped the country win the trade agreement.

Fracking

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In this video segment adapted from Need to Know, learn about health concerns regarding exposure to chemicals used in natural gas drilling. An animation shows how the process of hydraulic fracturing—fracking—is used to extract natural gas. A reporter explains how the process may be polluting water resources with hazardous chemicals. Hear about health problems among people whose only common connection is proximity to gas drilling sites. In addition, learn about the challenges of investigating the possible link between the contaminants and illness because the gas industry is not required to disclose which chemicals they use in fracking fluids.

Clamming

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Support your Health, Civics, and Science curriculum with this video that profiles a Long Island clammer who specializes in local distribution. Then, use the accompanying lesson plan, "The Edible Backyard: Discovering Food Traditions and Sources in Your Community," to have students embark on community-focused research projects to create a multimedia classroom exhibit around the theme of “Eating Local.”

Three Mile Island Cooling Towers

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In this Building Block video from Frontline: Nuclear Reaction, the four cooling towers at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant dot the horizon at sunrise. Smoke billows from the two towers on the left. The Susquehanna River lies in the foreground.

Greater Boston | Can Organic Farms and Mosquito Control Coexist?

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This video segment from Greater Boston examines the issue of spraying pesticides to combat disease-carrying insects. Massachusetts had been planning to use aerial spraying to control the spread of eastern equine encephalitis, a disease spread by mosquitoes. Ron Maribett, an organic farmer, said that if the state sprayed pesticides it would harm his business. The state said it would avoid spraying organic farms, but Maribett would have to bring livestock inside for 48 hours and avoid harvesting crops for two days. Another resident of the area believed that the spraying was necessary, but that farmers should be compensated for any losses.

New Contaminants in the Water Supply

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This video segment adapted from FRONTLINE: "Poisoned Waters" explains how the Potomac River, like many others, serves as both a drinking water supply and a dumping ground for wastewater. With proper processing, this system works well. However, water treatment removes only known contaminants; there is a growing concern about "new contaminants," chemicals in the water that are still unregulated but could cause harm to humans and animals.

PCB Cleanup in Seattle

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The PCB cleanup of South Park, a Seattle neighborhood along the Duwamish River is discussed in this video segment adapted from FRONTLINE: Poisoned Waters. In 2004, the community learned that some of its streets and yards were contaminated with toxic chemicals called PCBs. Citizens, galvanized by the finding, demanded the long-promised cleanup of an abandoned asphalt plant. The proposed cleanup led to a debate, when the Port of Seattle promised to reduce PCBs to the EPA standard of 25 parts per million (ppm), but residents demanded a stricter standard of 1 ppm. After debate, the city agreed to the stricter standard.

Adopting Sustainable Food Practices

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This video segment adapted from United Tribes Technical College looks at how the traditional subsistence practices of indigenous people were once sustainable, unlike today's lifestyles. Most foods are now produced and transported using methods that can damage the environment and contribute to climate change.

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