Evolution

Homo Sapiens Versus Neanderthals

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Explore the origins of modern humans. Fossil evidence from Middle East caves and elsewhere has revealed some competitive advantages modern humans, known as Homo sapiens, are believed to have held over the more archaic human species, Neanderthals. For example, during the time in which the two species may have coexisted, Homo sapiens lived on high ground, from which they could survey the landscape and plan their hunting expeditions. Some scientists have theorized that the success of this strategy may have contributed to the demise of the valley-dwelling Neanderthals, who became extinct about 30,000 years ago. Adapted from NOVA.

This video is available in both English and Spanish audio, along with corresponding closed captions.

Turtle Defense

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In this video from the WPSU’s series Outside, a staff member from Shaver’s Creek Environmental Center at Penn State University explains how some species of turtle protect themselves in their environment. Turtles, like many other species, are facing obstacles that threaten their survival. Some of these obstacles have threatened turtle survival for centuries, while others have emerged more recently and are caused by human activities.

This video is available in both English and Spanish audio, along with corresponding closed captions.

Otter Power! | Wild Kratts

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The Kratt brothers learn about adapting to their environment. They have a close call with a gar fish while they teach Slider the otter how to hunt. The brothers come to the creature rescue.

Salmon | Science Trek

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This video segment from IdahoPTV's Science Trek follows the life cycle of Idaho's salmon from a mountain stream to the ocean and back. These anadromous fish face some obstacles in completing this cycle. Find out how dams affect their progress.

That Time It Rained for Two Million Years | Eons

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At the beginning of the Triassic Period, with the continents locked together from pole-to-pole in the supercontinent of Pangea, the world is hot, flat, and very, very dry. But then 234 million years ago, the climate suddenly changed for the wetter.

How Horses Took over North America (Twice) | Eons

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The ancestors of modern horses became so successful that they spread all over the world, to Europe, Asia, South America, and Africa. But in their native range of North America, they’ll vanish for 10,000 years. Until another strange mammal brings them back.

Sledding Otter-Style | Wild Kratts

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Join the Wild Kratt gang as they go sledding with an otter, a natural sledder! Their soft, warm fur next to their skin keeps them warm, even when they're sliding on their bellies. They also see that geese can stand on ice without getting cold. However, Martin isn't so lucky!

Mystery Dino Science

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Students learn about dinosaur fossils in this short video. Using just a few bones, paleontologists can predict a dinosaur's size, diet, age and other features.

The Age of Reptiles in Three Acts | Eons

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Reptiles emerged from the Paleozoic as humble creatures, but in time, they grew to become some of the largest forms of life ever to stomp, swim, and soar across the planet. This Age of Reptiles was a spectacular prehistoric epic, and it all took place in a single era: the Mesozoic.

The Rise and Fall of the Bone-Crushing Dogs | Eons

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A huge and diverse subfamily of dogs, the bone-crushers patrolled North America for more than thirty million years, before they disappeared in the not-too-distant past. So what happened to the biggest dogs that ever lived?

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