Geography

What's in a Name

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Based on the WyomingPBS program What’s in a Name, students will view episodes of  the program to learn about how Wyoming towns got their names. In the introductory video Phil Roberts from the University of Wyoming introduces the PBS series entitled “Main Street Wyoming: What’s in a Name”. This introductory clip discusses how early explorers first named the rivers, streams, and mountain ranges and passes of Wyoming. Students will then work as a group to create a fictitious Wyoming town.

 

Devonian Fossil Gorge Aerial View | Iowa Land and Sky

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During the floods of 1993 and 2008, Coralville Lake in Coralville, Iowa exceeded its capacity, and excess water flowed over the emergency spillway. The 1993 overflow continued for 28 days and washed away road, campground, and up to 17 feet of soil and rock, exposing the Devonian bedrock, a 375 million-year-old seafloor. The area was widened in 2008 when floodwaters again swept through. This aerial view of the fossil gorge shows the scale and scope of the gorge and it’s relation to the spillway.

Risks and Benefits of Living Near a Volcano | Volcano on the Brink

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Learn how fluoride contamination of the drinking water due to volcanic activity leads to health problems for the population surrounding Mt. Nyamuragira in the Democratic Republic of Congo, while nutrients from lava create rich soil and productive farmland, in this video from NOVA: Volcano on the Brink. Use this resource to evaluate the hazards and benefits that living near this volcano has for the Congolese people in this region.

Population, Sustainability, and Malthus | Crash Course World History

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Join host John Green to learn about human population. How many people can reasonably live on the Earth? In 1800, the human population of the Earth passed one billion. Thomas Malthus posited that growth had hit its ceiling and that the population would level off. He was completely wrong, as there are currently seven billion people on the planet! John will teach a little about how Malthus made his calculations and explain how Malthus came up with the wrong answer.

Supranationalism and Devolution | The Power of Place

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This half hour video program features two segments set in Europe. The first, Strasbourg: Symbol of a United Europe, focuses on the coexistence of French and German cultures in the city of Strasbourg, France. Slovakia: New Sovereignty, the second case study featured in the video, discusses the birth of Slovakia and the Czech Republic and the problematic transition from the old Czechoslovakia to these two new states.

Small Farms, Big Cities | The Power of Place

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The two case studies in the half hour video Small Farms, Big Cities highlight a modern paradox in Japan, the coexistence of both the mega-city of Tokyo and small-scale agriculture. A farmer's story in the first case study illustrates climatic conditions in Tohoku, or Northeast Japan, and the influence of natural hazards upon agricultural productivity. In the second case study, a commuter from Saitama provides insight into the continued growth of one of the world's largest metropolitan areas.

Haiti: Relief Efforts Meet Staggering Obstacles

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On January 12, 2010, Haiti was leveled by one of the most devastating earthquakes in recorded history. Those responsible for handling the catastrophe, including the Haitian state and the United Nations, were crippled by disaster and struggled to respond.

In this video chapter from FRONTLINE The Quake, correspondent Martin Smith travels to Haiti to bear witness to this humanitarian crisis and the ill-coordinated relief efforts on the ground. 

The video contains graphic images. Please preview before classroom viewing.

Know Ohio | Great Lakes Plains

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The Great Lakes Plains is one of four major land regions in Ohio. Located on the shores of Lake Erie, it is home to Ohio’s largest ports in Cleveland and Toledo which draw international shipping and trading. Conversely, the flat land created by glaciers in the Ice Age provides for outstanding agriculture.

The Bozeman Trail | Who Was Henry Beebe Carrington?

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This is a short biography on Colonel Henry Beebe Carrington. It gives an overview of his involvement in the Bozeman Trail, including the forts he constructed/occupied and the war he fought against the Native Americans. 

Trail of Tears

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In this video segment adapted from American Experience: "We Shall Remain," reenactments help tell the story of how the Cherokee people were forced from their lands in the southeast. The U.S. government initially promised the Cherokee and other Native American tribes that if they could assimilate into European Americans lifestyles, they would be considered equals. But a new movement in the late 1820s, supported by President Andrew Jackson, promoted removal of Native Americans from the eastern U.S. The Indian Removal Act, passed in 1830, called for the tribes to leave peacefully. Feeling that removal from their own lands was not an option, the vast majority of people stayed. When the deadline to leave passed, federal troops and state militia forcefully assembled the Cherokee people, letting them take nothing but the clothes on their backs, and made them march an 850-mile trek to new lands. Many died on this march, known as the Trail of Tears, which lasted through one of the hardest winters the region had ever experienced.

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