Government

What Does a Governor Do? | Things Explained

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In this episode of Things Explained, we discuss the role and responsibilities of Georgia's governor and how the position compares to that of the U.S. president. We also highlight some political dynamics of the state and some of Georgia's most famous governors.

Caustic Causes Lesson Plan

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In this lesson, to be used with the program The War of 1812, students will work in groups to study one of these causes of the war: impressment, the Chesapeake Affair, orders-in-council, First Nations, and the War Hawks. Students will then determine whether or not their one cause is enough to go to war over. Students will examine all costs that are involved in war - financial and human.

Learning Objective(s):

  • Students will work in groups to study one of these causes of the war: impressment, the Chesapeake Affair, orders-in-council, First Nations, and the War Hawks.
  • Students will identify reasons to go to war or not, and create a presentation to present to their classmates.

Theodore Roosevelt and the Western Experience

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Theodore Roosevelt and the Western Experience examines the 26th president of the United States. TR or Teddy as he has come to be known, balanced his identity of an intellectual from the East with the frontiersman of the West. His love of nature as a boy carried on throughout his life, influencing policy decisions as president that we still see today.  

Great States | Minnesota Government

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Learn more about the state and tribal governments of Minnesota, and how they came to be. 

David Broder on the First Congress | Ken Burns: The Congress

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David Broder talks about the importance of the First United States Congress. It was a miracle that they invented something that would stand the test of time.

David McCullough on Voting | Ken Burns: The Congress

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David McCullough talks about the real reason members vote for or against legislation.

Foreign Service Officers

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U.S. Department of State employees, with their skills, character and commitment to public service, are the backbone of America’s diplomacy. They represent the American people, advocate U.S. interests to the rest of the world and are America’s first line of defense in a complex and often dangerous world. This media gallery focuses on the five types of Foreign Service Officers, also known as U.S. Diplomats.

The White House: Inside Story | 9-11 at the White House

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For the people that worked there, the White House was always the safest place to be. However, that changed on September 11, 2001. After the attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, many suspected the White House was the next target. A big Congressional Picnic was canceled, and everyone was given ten minutes to evacuate. The leadership, minus President Bush, moved to the Presidential Emergency Operation Center, a bunker under the White House. However, Chief Usher Gary Walters and a few of his staff stayed behind at the White House to remove benches and a stage in order to ensure that President Bush could come back and address the American people from the Oval Office.

Looking for Lincoln | Abraham Lincoln's Words

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In this video segment, from the PBS documentary Looking for Lincoln, Professor Henry Louis Gates, Jr. cites several of Lincoln's most famous lines of oratory from different points in his political career, noting the "seemingly simple but profoundly eloquent language" he used "to express and ennoble his cause."

The White House: Inside Story | The Early Years of the White House

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Although he would never have the chance to live there, President George Washington oversaw the design and construction of The President's House - The White House. From choosing the location, to overseeing a design competition, to laying the first cornerstone of the House in 1792, Washington insured that all future American Presidents and the United States would have an iconic symbol of shared history and heritage. That symbol was threated in 1814 when the British, during the War of 1812, invaded the Capital and set fire to the White House. Luckily, First Lady Dolley Madison had the foresight to direct the removal of a few important items from the house…including Washington’s famous portrait. Today, it is one of the few things that have been in the White House since its construction.

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