History

Rev. Frank Dukes: Selective Buying Campaign

Icon: 
Streaming icon

In 1962, Miles College student Frank Dukes helped organize andparticipated in a selective buying campaign in Birmingham, Alabama. Byboycotting downtown businesses that discriminated against them, AfricanAmericans used buying power as political leverage in the struggle forequality. In this interview, Dukes describes his role in the grassrootseffort that shook Birmingham's economy.

Taking the Reins: Women Who Contributed to the Development of the West | Idaho Experience

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This “Taking the Reins” episode of Idaho Experience traces the remarkable paths of two Idaho women: Katherine Caroline Wilkins, born to fortune-seeking pioneers in Oregon Territory, was one of the most successful horse-sellers in the United States. And May Arkwright Hutton became one of the richest women in the American West, using her newfound wealth to promote suffrage and later running for the Idaho Legislature.

The Bank of North Dakota | The NPL and the Bank

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Learn how A. C. Townley’s Non-Partisan League’s membership rose quickly and soon endorsed candidates for their state ownership platform. The NPL-controlled legislature passed several bills providing support to farmers, including creation of the only state-owned bank in the country.

The NPL-controlled legislature passed several bills providing support to farmers, including creation of the only state-owned bank in the country.

The Bank of North Dakota | The Bank Today

Icon: 
Streaming icon

The Bank of North Dakota is fulfilling the vision of the farmers who created it, serving as the development bank for the state. The bank makes loans to farmers, new businesses, and college students, while profits return to the state’s treasury.

Colorado Coined | Colorado Experience

Icon: 
Streaming icon

The Denver Mint was modeled off the Medici supported architecture in Florence, Italy. It opened in 1904 as an essay office and began minting coins in 1906. Due to the earthquake in San Francisco in 1906, Denver’s coins began to proliferate across the entire west. In 1934, the Federal Government shifted the gold supply from San Francisco to Denver’s Mint, shipping $26.4 billion in gold from San Francisco to Denver. In the 1930’s, Denver had stored collectively more gold then had ever been before on Earth. Coinage in the United States represents the thing which we admire, the values which we hold as a nation. The Denver Mint is representative of the West, the pioneering and venturing ideals of Americans, past and future.

Career Connections | Hospitality Management

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Hospitality-related careers include bed-and-breakfast manager, wedding planner, and restaurant owner. Viewers will see how an understanding of both the fine arts and financial literacy are important in this line of work.

Career Connections | Restaurant Management

Icon: 
Streaming icon

In this video viewers will learn why having knowledge and competence in customer service, world languages, fine arts, and financial literacy are critical for a restaurant manager.

The History of the Bobcat

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Learn about how the Keller brothers from Minnesota invented the first Bobcat loader, and built it using scrap metal.

E-Business | Jeffrey Bezos

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Hear about the flexibility of the internet and its shaping by new technologies and decreasing costs in these early years of development, from Jeffrey Bezos, the founder and CEO of Amazon.com. The rise of the Internet has provided a new market for North Dakota businesses. With shopping at a store now being as easy as typing in a web address, distance from consumers is becoming less of an issue in the business world.

People and Businesses | Steamboats on the Red

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Learn how communities began to develop on the banks of the Red River along the steamboats’ route in this video from the Steamboats on the Red series. With new, cheaper means of transportation come people—first workers, then settlers, then merchants. 

Looking at the shallow twists and turns of the Red River, it’s hard to imagine that steam-powered paddlewheel boats were once the most important transportation link between St. Paul, Minnesota, and Winnipeg, Manitoba. From the first in 1859 to the last that sank in 1909, Red River steamboats hauled thousands of settlers and millions of tons of freight across the border between the United States and Canada. Although it lasted barely 50 years, the age of the steamboat forged a commercial network between the two countries that exists to this day in the Interstate-29 corridor.

Pages