Human ecology

Faces of the Oil Patch | Carol Goodbear (Exploitation)

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Carol Goodbear, the legislative director for the Three Affiliated Tribes, recognizes that the exploitation of oil is profitable, but at what cost?

Harsh Reality | Steamboats on the Red

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Learn about how the 1870s was an era of prosperity along the Red River, and the steamboat industry was flourishing, in this video from the Steamboats on the Red series. Seen as dashing and romantic, steamboats were the fastest way to travel great distances north and south along the Red River but not really the most comfortable. The boat itself was noisy and overcrowded; passengers had to deal with clouds of mosquitoes along the route; and the large boats ran aground often as they tried to negotiate tight bends in the river.

Looking at the shallow twists and turns of the Red River, it’s hard to imagine that steam-powered paddlewheel boats were once the most important transportation link between St. Paul, Minnesota, and Winnipeg, Manitoba. From the first in 1859 to the last that sank in 1909, Red River steamboats hauled thousands of settlers and millions of tons of freight across the border between the United States and Canada. Although it lasted barely 50 years, the age of the steamboat forged a commercial network between the two countries that exists to this day in the Interstate-29 corridor.

Faces of the Oil Patch | Dennis R. Fox (Nontribal Members)

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Hear Dennis R. Fox who says, “It's not a bad thing. It’s a good thing that we’re developing the oil on the reservation, that people are benefiting from it."

New York | Ken Burns: Horatio's Drive

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They crossed the Hudson at Albany, New York to a cheering crowd and met up with reporters and Mrs. Horatio Jackson in Peekskill, NY. They drove into Manhattan at 4:30 in the morning on July 26th. The trip took 63 days, 23 hours, and 30 minutes. Horatio, Crocker, and Bud were the toast of town. The story took on epic proportions in the newspapers.

Citizen Scientists | Idaho Science Journal

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A new smart phone app is helping citizen scientists leave their mark.

Idaho State University researchers have developed an app for community input on the Portneuf River. Reporter Kris Millgate follows one family as they use the app to help stakeholders discover the places people value along the river.

 

Red River Divide | Flooding

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Learn about the history and geology of the Red River of the North and the surrounding plains, including glacial Lake Agassiz, the many floods in recorded history, and disaster relief and protection in the past. Government leaders who with dealt with the 1997 flood talk about its lasting impact and the real possibility of another flood as bad or even worse in the future.

Rare Nebraska Featuring the Loess Canyon

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As a companion to NET’s The PlainStory podcast, NET has produced a set of immersive, experiential videos designed to give viewers a taste of rare Nebraskan habitats via 360 video and audio. We recommend viewing these using the Chrome browser and using headphones to get the full audio effect. We also recommend checking out The PlainStory podcast at plainstorypodcast.org, or wherever great podcasts are downloaded.

Living from the Land and Sea

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Learn about the cycle of seasons that guides the traditional Alaska Native subsistence way of life, in this video adapted from the Alaska Native Heritage Center focuses. As the seasons change and the available resources change, so do Alaska Native peoples' hunting and gathering activities. Recognizing the interdependence of life in nature, Alaska Native groups have respect for the land, sea, and animals. They also demonstrate respect for the Elders living among them. The integration of technology, including snowmobiles and GPS, into their subsistence activities demonstrates a blending of tradition and modern ways.

The Effect of Land Masses on Climate

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This ThinkTV segment demonstrates the complex relationships between the land and Earth's climate system. It emphasizes five land factors that influence climate: latitude, elevation, topography, surface reflectivity, and land use.

Mother Nature in Charge | When the Water Came

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Jeff Frith, manager of the Devils Lake Basin Joint Water Resource Board, explains how the flooding of Devils Lake began in 1993 with some areas of the basin getting nearly thirty inches of rain that year. The fall of 2008 through the spring of 2009 brought more rain and snow, causing a dramatic rise in the lake. Frith explains the amount acreage lost and the economic losses of the past year.

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