Human ecology

Barrio de Paz | Global Oneness Project

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Students watch a short film, Barrio de Paz by Emmanuel Vaughan-Lee, which tells the story of peace worker Nelsa Libertad Curbelo and the city's gang youth, who have left behind a life of crime to come together and provide services to their struggling community. Loved like a mother, Nelsa has helped the gangs channel their need for unity, structure, and love into the power to participate in society.

In this lesson, students explore how respect, trust, and love can transform youth violence. Through classroom discussion, students examine reasons why young people join gangs and ways those instincts can become the foundation for creative participation in society. Reflective writing prompts are also included for students to demonstrate their understanding of the story.

 

 

Iñupiaq Whale Hunt

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This video, adapted from material provided by the ECHO partners, shows a whale hunt with Native Iñupiaq hunters. The Iñupiaq people have been hunting whales for thousands of years, and many of their hunting methods and traditions continue to be passed down from generation to generation. On this expedition, the crew successfully kills a bowhead whale. The entire community joins together to bring in the whale, butcher and distribute it, and then celebrate the hunt.

Arctic Son: Should Oil Drilling Be Allowed in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge?

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In this clip, Stan Sr. shows the process of hunting caribou, and explains why he feels it's important to preserve the calving grounds for future generations.

Learning English in China

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Watch as correspondent Ramy Inocencio reports on the growing influence of globalization in China and how it is a driving force for citizens to learn English. Use the lesson plan to understands basic concepts about international economics, patterns and networks of economic interdependence, and how cultural trends can affect a global marketplace and international business.

Haiti

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Reporter Antonio Neves examines the global effort to rebuild and restore hope to Haiti after a devastating earthquake. Use this video and accompanying lesson plans to explore international efforts to rebuild Haiti after the 2010 earthquake and examine how Haiti’s difficult history may have contributed to the nation’s problems before the earthquake. Understand the extent of damage Haiti experienced and gain insight into the role technology played in raising funds for disaster relief to the island nation.

The Boys of Baraka

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Devon, Montrey, Richard, and Romesh are just at that age — 12 and 13 years old — when boys start to become men. But in their hometown of Baltimore, one of the country’s most poverty-stricken cities for inner-city residents, African-American boys have a very high chance of being incarcerated or killed before they reach adulthood. The boys are offered an amazing opportunity in the form of the Baraka school, a project founded to break the cycle of violence through an innovative education program that literally removed young boys from low-performing public schools and unstable home environments. They travel with their classmates to rural Kenya in East Africa, where a teacher-student ratio of one to five, a strict disciplinary program and a comprehensive curriculum form the core of their new educational program. The Boys of Baraka follows along with their journey, and examines each boy’s transformation during this remarkable time.

Ranger Baker: This is America | Ken Burns: The National Parks

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Ranger Gerard Baker talks about the national parks being the real America. When you walk into any National Park, you are walking into someone's house, church, or home.

Green Corn, Native American Gold | Georgia Stories

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When you bite into a hot, buttered ear of corn you are enjoying food with an ancient history in Georgia. Corn is the foodstuff responsible for prehistoric Native Americans flourishing in Georgia. Diamond Brown, a Cherokee dancer describes its importance as it is celebrated in the sacred Green Corn ceremony. Through interviews, reenactments, and visits to significant Native American sites in Georgia, the story of the changing culture of Indians from their arrival and existence as wandering hunters to the development of the mound building culture unfolds.

The Bronze Age Superhighway | The Greeks

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By 3200 BC, as obsidian, copper, lead, and marble were shipped from Italy to the Middle East, the Cycladic people prospered by taking advantage of their central location and developing many bustling ports of entry in what are now the Greek Islands.

New York’s "Little Liberia" Faces Ebola Stigma

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Explore the challenges that New York City's Little Liberia is facing with this video and educational materials from PBS NewsHour from October 24, 2014.

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