human evolution

SciGirls | Digging Archaeology 04: Data Collection 2

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The SciGirls rappel down to a cliffside cave and take samples from the granary to determine if there are any pollen samples or other information about the ancient people of the area. They learn about the construction of the granary and take some measurements to understand its size.

Human Evolution: Early Human Diets | Smithsonian Science How

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Discover fossil evidence of some of the earliest humans on Earth. Meet Dr. Briana Pobiner, an Anthropologist at the National Museum of Natural History. Share her excitement about holding an animal bone that was handled by an early human more than 1 million years ago. Consider what you can learn about early humans from cut marks on ancient animal bones. Contemplate the significance of the evolution of meat-eating in humans. See how Briana is helping us better understand the lives of our 1.5-million-year-old ancestors.

Are Humans Still Evolving? 12 Days of Evolution #11 | It's Okay to Be Smart

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Some of the biggest evolution questions finally answered.

Understanding the Gap in Human Evolution

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Learn how a new discovery (announced in 2015) may fill a key gap in the record of human evolution, in this video from NOVA: Dawn of Humanity. Fossils of early humans indicate the first recognizable human species, Homo erectus, evolved 3 to 2 million years ago. There were more apelike human ancestors before then, but there is little information about the transition to more humanlike characteristics. For years, there has been a gap in the fossil record of human evolution. However, in 2015, scientists announced the discovery of a trove of fossils in South Africa that may help fill that gap and offer new insight into the evolution of humans.

The Human Spark | The Art Spark

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In this video segment from The Human Spark, host Alan Alda ventures to Southwestern France where it is believed Neanderthals first made their homes in rock shelters. The crew makes their way to Cat Blanc, one of the rock shelters speculated to have sheltered not only Neanderthals, but also early humans. Horse carvings made from fifteen to twenty thousand years ago by early humans indicate that they brought with them something the Neanderthals lacked - "the human spark."

Why Do We Feel Mind-Blown? | BrainCraft

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Is a mind-blowing moment rewarding and addictive? We discuss the emotional aspects of being mind-blown in this episode.

SciGirls | Digging Archaeology 01: Mentor Moment

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Seeing women who have succeeded in STEM helps inspire and motivate girls, especially when they can relate to these mentors as people with full lives both inside and outside of the lab. The SciGirls learn how their mentor got interested in archaeology and pursued her passion in her career.

When Humans Lost Their Tails | Your Inner Fish

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By looking at our vestigial tailbone—the coccyx—we can trace back the history of human and primate evolution. Unlike all other primates, apes don't have a tail, but when did our ancestors lose this potentially useful appendage? Paleoanthropologist Holly Dunsworth introduces Neil Shubin to Proconsul, a fossil ape that provides some answers to that question.

Why Do Men Have Nipples? - 12 Days of Evolution #7 | It's Okay to Be Smart

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Some of the biggest evolution questions finally answered.

Forensic Anthropology: Bone Whispering | Smithsonian Science How

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Examine what skeletons can tell you about how people lived and died. Meet Kari Bruwelheide, a Forensic Anthropologist and Physical Anthropologist at the National Museum of Natural History. Join her in probing the mysteries contained in human bones. See the sophisticated technologies being used to extract information from bones, and think about how bones will be studied in the future. Consider what an old skeleton reveals about people and places of the past. Learn how Kari is analyzing skeletal remains along with historical records and other artifacts to recreate a picture of human life in the Colonial Chesapeake.

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