human evolution

Walking in the Woods | Your Inner Fish

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Learn about the fossil discoveries that allowed experts to piece together the history of bipedality in human evolution. Neil Shubin pays a visit to Tim White and Owen Lovejoy, two anthropologists working together to understand "Ardi," a 4.4-million-year-old fossil that sheds light on our transition to bipedalism.

Climate and Human Evolution

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Learn how the analysis of rock layers and ocean sediments supports the theory that rapid climate change may have jump-started human evolution two million years ago in this video from NOVA: "Becoming Human".

Walking Tall

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Walking and running upright on two feet as humans do requires some specialized adaptations of the skeleton and muscles. Modern human anatomy has built on the strengths and the weaknesses of a body plan inherited from distant ancestors, giving us an efficient and graceful gait and a range of painful problems from back injuries to fallen arches. From Evolution: "Great Transformations".

Why Are Some People Left-Handed? | It's Okay to Be Smart

Icon: 
Streaming icon

We've got two perfectly good hands attached to two perfectly good arms, so why do most people prefer to use one over the other for common tasks?

The Human Spark | Links in the Evolutionary Chain

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This video segment from The Human Spark explores some of the branches of our family tree as host Alan Alda visits the Museum of Natural History in New York City. Ian Tattersall, the curator of anthropology at the museum and one of the world’s leading experts on human evolution, presents several skulls from the museum’s collection, pointing out how the size and shape of the skulls evolved over time. John Shea, one of the leading experts on stone-age technology, demonstrates how to make a stone axe, a tool that was used unchanged by our ancestors for millions of years.

How Many Smells Can You Smell? | It's Okay to Be Smart

Icon: 
Streaming icon

We walk through life led by our noses. Literally. Because they’re on the front of our faces. How does the sense of smell work, and how sensitive are our noses? Why are smell-related memories so vivid? How many different smells could we possibly smell?

A Handy Gift from Ancient Primates | Your Inner Fish

Icon: 
Streaming icon

The history of early primate evolution can tell us amazing detail about the function of our human hands today. Our hand has the same basic form as the hands of all other primates, but what did the earliest version of this hand look like? Neil Shubin pays a visit to Jon Bloch, who shows him a remarkable fossil of Notharctus, an early primate with a hand that you may recognize.

NOVA | A Neanderthal Burial: Decoding Neanderthals

Icon: 
Streaming icon

In this video from the NOVA series, Decoding Neanderthals, scientist Michael Walker leads his team into a deep shaft, where they find the bones of Neanderthals. Based on the bodies' positions, he thinks that rather than dying in an accident, they probably were actually buried. Also, a panther's paws were found at the site. Since there is no sign of an animal disturbing the bones, it is possible that the Neanderthals killed the panther and kept the paws as a trophy.

Why Haven't We Found Alien Life? | PBS Space Time

Icon: 
Streaming icon

With millions of Earth like planets around sun like stars in our galaxy alone, why don't we see intelligent alien life? Or any other life for that matter? It gets especially weird when you factor in new scientific revelations that life on Earth occurred crazy fast! So if you want to help us theorize on the real reasons we haven't found alien life, you should watch today's episode of Space Time!

The Psychology of Accents | BrainCraft

Icon: 
Streaming icon

In this episode, we look at the surprising effects behind our accents.

Pages