Immigration

NOVA: Percy Julian: Forgotten Genius | Getting an Education

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Learn about the education of chemist Percy Julian. Julian's early educational years paralleled an educational movement that prepared African Americans for industrial jobs, the growing white supremacist movement, and the rise of the Ku Klux Klan. Julian would eventually move north, and finally to Europe to earn his Ph.D. Explore more about this topic, from the NOVA program Percy Julian: Forgotten Genius.

This video is available in both English and Spanish audio, along with corresponding closed captions.

Stephanie Murphy - US Congresswoman l Vietnamese Orlando

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Vietnamese immigrant and Central Florida resident, U.S. Congresswoman Stephanie Murphy, shares the story of her path to the American dream.

Minnesota Legacy Short | The Orphan Trains

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In the 1800s, the railroads faced a problem - farm labor shortages along their newly expanded westward lines threatened profitability. Not surprisingly, in 1853, they jumped at the chance to support a New York City minister's idea - an early version of foster care that would find homes for the city's orphans on farms in the Midwest. Until the program ended in 1929, more than a quarter of a million abandoned, homeless, and orphaned children were taken from the streets, tenements, and orphanages of New York City and sent to uncertain futures with strangers.

An Orphan Train Rider Finds a Home | West by Orphan Train

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In this segment from the West by Orphan Train documentary, Mercy Train rider Bernadette Schaefer recalls her happy childhood after she was placed on a farm in Nebraska as a young child. Bernadette, was three months old when her then nineteen-year-old mother placed her at the New York Foundling Hospital. Eventually she was surrendered by her mother, allowing the Sisters of Charity to arrange for her travel to her new home on what was known as a Mercy Train.

Built on Agriculture - Selkirk Settlers | Perseverance and Hardship

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The ownership of land and the respect for property, that was something that was really important to the Selkirk Settlers and why they were so determined to persevere in the face of all these hardships.

What Does the SAT Really Test? | PBS Idea Channel

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How's that SAT prep going? Need some SAT tips? Well, here's one: The SAT may not actually be measuring your anything. That's right, your SAT scores, despite what colleges and high schools across America may like for you to believe, may not reflect anything new. There is actually substantial evidence that instead of broad aptitudes, the SATs only measure a specific set of non-quantitative, cultural values and ideas. Don't scratch those SAT dates off your calendar yet though, because it is still important, and on this week's episode of Idea Channel, let's look at why.

Scandinavian Traditions | Lutefisk

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Traditional food and cooking methods is one way that North Dakotans celebrate their Scandinavian heritage and find part of their own identity in their ethnic background. “No tree grows strong by cutting off its roots.” Understanding where we come from helps us know who we are. North Dakota’s largest demographic is people of Scandinavian descent. Many people in North Dakota are aware of their roots, know who they are, and take an active role in keeping those traditions alive.

It's All Earth and Sky | Love of the Land and Growing Things

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The need to plant and nurture growing things is common among Germans from Russia, even off the farm. Each of the speakers share examples from their life experiences common to many Germans from Russia. 

 

Liberty Minutes | Migration to the Dakotas

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Listen as historian William Sherman describes the people who migrated to the Dakotas in the 1880s and 1890s and the reasons they came here.

The Amish | Iowa Pathways

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The Amish religion started in Europe in the 1500s. Due to persecution and rising land costs, they decided to migrate to America in the 1700s where they settled in Pennsylvania. They gradually expanded into adjoining states, reaching Iowa in the 1840s.

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