Immigration

Great States | Idaho History

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From the Ice Age to the Civil War, learn the story of how Idaho became the 43rd state.

20th Century Italian Immigration: America the Melting Pot…or Not?

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Explore the experiences of twentieth century American immigrants alongside renowned chef Tom Colicchio as he learns about his Italian ancestor’s arrival to Ellis Island in this episode of Finding Your Roots. Learn about how some immigrants made multiple trips to and from America from their homelands and the difficult conditions they faced as new citizens.

The Germans from Russia | Story of Carl and Catherina

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Hear the story of Carl and Caterina: a Prairie love story. They grew up together side-by-side on the plains and were married in 1907. By 1923 they had nine children, that winter was a difficult one. Carl came down with diptheria and four of the nine children were sick. When they ran out of coal, Carl insisted he retrieve some from a neighboring town. Upon his return he took to bed, and died the next morning.Within a week, Catherina and two of their children died. They could not be parted. Children of the Steppe, Children of the Prairie is the story of the Germans from Russia -- agricultural pioneers on several continents whose quest for land and peace shaped them into a distinctive and enduring ethnic group.

Prairie Churches | Hail and Brimstone

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Listen to stories of building the South Immanuel Lutheran Church, Rothsay, Minnesota, and St. Peter and Paul Church, Strasburg, North Dakota, the latter including a significant hailstorm. Other churches in North Dakota, Minnesota and Canada are also shown.

Great States | North Dakota Culture

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North Dakota’s festivals and events celebrate the people and communities there. Learn more about these communities and what makes North Dakota a great place to be.

The Germans from Russia | Living and Working

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Learn how the Germans from Russia settled across America, but many found home in what came to be known as the German triangle which spanned across Manitoba and the Dakotas. The Germans were given land under the homestead act which led them away from living in villages, which they had grown accustomed to in the "old" country. Having to live so far from their neighbors caused isolation and many looked forward to visiting day. They were strong people who had inhabited land much like the land they had left, full of fierce winters, a place where "wind was always in the grass" and the fields were filled with stones.

Orphan Trains Bring Children to Midwestern Communities | West by Orphan Train

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A majority of the children who were resettled during the Orphan Train movement went to the Midwest. Some children were placed in homes on the Eastern Seaboard and others in the South and West. It is estimated that between six and ten thousand children were settled in Iowa, with many Midwestern states taking similar amounts. This segment from the West by Orphan Train documentary includes archival photography, historical re-enactments, and an interview with Amanda Wahlmeier, former Curator at the National Orphan Train Complex.

The Germans from Russia | Lifestyle in Russia and the Northern Prairies

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See how the Germans from Russia tried to establish the same kind of villages and lives they had back in Russia. Many of the villages were named after the first community leaders. Homes were built from sandstone, mud, and other materials indigenous to the area. Cellars were used everywhere to store vegetables until the next harvest. They tried to create "home" in America. It is said that American men do not cry, but men from the Germans from Russia background did, they cried for home. Their home-sickness caused a hole in their hearts.

Great States | Montana History

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Learn about Montana’s land and people from before the Gold Rush to modern day.

Prairie Churches | Expressions of Faith

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Learn about Vikur Lutheran Church in Mountain, North Dakota. A montage of northern plains churches illustrates NDSU History Professor Tom Isern’s assertion that we can learn from prairie churches about the people of the plains who built them.

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