Immigration

Built on Agriculture - Selkirk Settlers | European Immigration and Rail Line Development

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The settlement grew and eventually it became Winnipeg. The waves of immigration from Europe followed. Between 1879 and 1881, 58,000 immigrants came to Manitoba.

Mercy Trains Transport Orphaned Infants in the Late 1800s to Early 1900s | West by Orphan Train

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In 1869 a group of Roman Catholic nuns established the New York Foundling Hospital to help care for and place homeless infants. Following the example of the already established Children’s Aid Society, trains were used to transport children to new homes. These became known as Mercy Trains. People who wanted a child could request specific attributes of the children they wanted to adopt. This segment from the West by Orphan Train documentary includes archival photographs and interviews with Amanda Wahlmeier, former Curator at the National Orphan Train Complex; and Renée Wendinger, historian, author and daughter of an Orphan Train rider.

Great States | Iowa History

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Explore the state named for the Ioway People, one of many American Indian groups that lived in the area. Learn how these groups were forcibly removed by European fortune seekers, paving the way for the expansion of railroads and farming.

It's All Earth and Sky | Citizenship and Language

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Brian Schweitzer and Al Neuharth talk about their ancestors’ citizenship status, and all five descendants talk of their family’s experiences with the German language. As they adjusted to a new life, the first generation found that learning a new language often proved difficult.

 

Germans from Russia in South America | Introduction

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Like North America before the turn of the 1900s, South America was a land of opportunity—a magnet of immigration from Europe and Asia. Many of these immigrants were directly related to Germans from Russia in the United States and Canada. They were a mixture of Black Sea Germans, Volga Germans, Volhynian Germans, Bessarabian Germans, and Mennonites.

The Legacies of the Orphan Train Riders | West by Orphan Train

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By the 1870s the Orphan trains of the Children’s Aid Society were rolling into towns in more than 30 states. An average of over three thousand children a year were taken out of orphanages and placed with families. It is estimated that there are now over two million descendants of Orphan Train riders. This segment from the West by Orphan Train documentary includes archival photographs and an interview with Amanda Wahlmeier, former Curator at the National Orphan Train Complex.

Timespan Museum: Helmsdale, Scotland | Manitoba Shorts

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Learn about the Timespan Museum in Helmsdale, which tells the history of the Scottish highlands, in this video from Prairie Public's Manitoba Shorts series. Many clans lived among the hills but were evicted to make room for sheep over 200 years ago. The foundations of their homes can still be seen today.

It's All Earth and Sky | Religious Traditions

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The preservation of religious traditions is discussed, including a unique hail avoidance measure. Arthur Flegel believes that religion is the mainstay of society.

It's All Earth and Sky | Agriculture and Traditions

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Arthur Flegel tells of turkey red wheat, which created the Bread Basket of the World in the upper Plains, even with dry land farming. The homestead living arrangement versus the European village with outlying fields system was a difficult adjustment.

 

An Orphan Train Rider Tells His Story | West by Orphan Train

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In this segment from the West by Orphan Train documentary, Orphan Train rider Stanley Cornell recounts the story of he and his brother’s experiences living in an orphanage and their eventual trip on an Orphan Train in the early 1900s. After being placed in six different homes, they were placed with a family in Texas who raised them.

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