Leadership

Grassroots Organizing: Creating and Sustaining a Vision for Great Public Schools | The Long View

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Grassroots organizing of parents and students in Oakland and around the country provides a vital counterbalance to the destabilizing influence of disinvestment and privatization on school systems and communities. Across the country, organizing is an essential tool for elevating the voices of low-income communities and communities of color in the conversation about public education. As Dr. Pedro Noguera, Distinguished Professor of Education, UCLA, says in The Long View, ‘The most important thing we have to learn is that the community can’t just leave decision-making up to the Board and the Superintendent. The public’s role is critical, and in order for the public to be heard, the public has to be organized.”

The Fight for Full and Fair Funding | The Long View

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Around the country, community groups, education advocates and civil rights attorneys have been fighting for fair funding for schools. In California in 2012, parents, students, community leaders, organizers, labor members and clergy joined forces across the state to pass Proposition 30, a ballot initiative that has raised an average of $6 billion a year for public schools. Turnout among low-income voters, voters of color, and first-time voters was a decisive factor in the Proposition’s passage. It was the first education tax increase passed by California voters in three decades.

Creating and Sustaining Equitable School Systems | The Long View

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In an effort to provide school sites with more decision-making authority, community groups and educators organized to pass a District-wide Shared Governance Policy. This segment shows the School Board meeting where the Policy was passed.

Eduardo's Story: Street Life Intervention | The Graduates Film Module

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This film module spotlights Eduardo's story, and how he is breaking the cycle of gang involvement through mentoring.

Response to Instruction and Intervention (RTI²)

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Response to Instruction and Intervention (RTI²) is a three-tiered approach to student learning that is focused on prevention and early intervention. RTI² uses assessment for instruction, intervention, and transition between these tiers for K-12 students as they develop skills in reading, reading comprehension, reading fluency, mathematics calculation, mathematics problem solving, and written expression. Learn more about RTI² and its implementation from experts at the Tennessee Department of Education.

Dealing with Controversy

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This video segment from Teaching Evolution Case Studies features teachers from around the country who discuss the controversies and challenges they face teaching evolution in public school classrooms. It highlights how teachers handle questions and criticisms from both students and parents. It then focuses on a specific case in Merrimack, New Hampshire, in which teachers and a school district addressed the controversy.

Strength in Numbers: Closing Achievement Gaps through Collaboration

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In this half hour documentary, follow principal Dr. Nancy Lubeski, in her search to improve the lives of her students in Strength In Numbers: Closing Achievement Gaps through Collaboration.  

2 years ago, Wexford Montessori Academy’s Principal, Dr. Nancy Lubeski, received sobering news. Her school had been designated as a high achievement gap school by the state of Michigan, which meant that it had one of the largest gaps between its top and bottom 30% of students. To help her students who were struggling, Dr. Lubeski got involved with a networked improvement community (NIC). Once in the NIC, she finally found the support she’d been searching for. She would work shoulder to shoulder with other principals, intermediate school district representatives, Michigan Department of Education personnel, and researchers from Regional Educational Laboratory (REL) Midwest who were all united in one goal--to close the large achievement gaps in their schools and districts. Together, they would discover that the path to closing the achievement gap, though difficult, could become clearer through collaboration.

The film connects research to practice by sharing the story of Wexford Montessori Academy in Lansing, Michigan, which participated in a NIC facilitated by REL Midwest. It is a co-production of DPTV and the Institute of Education Sciences' Regional Educational Laboratory Midwest.

Is School Enough?

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Is School Enough? documents vivid examples of where new modes of learning and engagement are taking hold and flourishing. This new approach reaches motivated students as well as kids that educators call “the bright and bored,” helping these learners tune in rather than drop out.

Fostering Youth Voice and Leadership | The Long View

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Youth organizing has been demonstrated to contribute to the social-emotional and academic development of young people, and fosters engagement in civic and community affairs. Organizing also increases young people’s sense of agency through the development of a structural analysis of problem they are facing. As Saa’un Bell, Strategy Director of Californians for Justice says, ‘Training young people to be organizers means training them with critical life skills. Organizing is about helping young people understand how they can contribute civically, and supporting them to advance racial justice.’

Want Great Schools? Invest in Teachers | The Long View

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Even with these investments, Life Academy still struggles to retain a strong cohort of experienced teachers – a challenge experienced around the country. Sustained improvement for students won’t happen without sustained attention and supports for teachers, says Dr. Linda Darling-Hammond in the film. “At the root of it, you can’t actually control your way to great teaching. You have to invest in the people who are doing it, and then trust them to use the knowledge and skills you have given them.”

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