microorganisms

Studying Extreme Microorganisms: The Origins of Life

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Learn how life on the edge of volcanoes sheds light on the origin of life on earth and the possibility of life on other planets in these videos from NATURE: Living Volcanos. Join Dr. Jeff Marlow and his team as they explore Marum Volcano in the South Pacific. Dr. Marlow discovers life on the edge of Marum which builds a picture of what life might look like on other planets that have more extreme environments than most of Earth. In the accompanying classroom activity, students analyze data from Dr. Marlow’s exploration of the connection between rock formation and the microorganisms that live in the rocks. Additional support materials are available including discussion questions and vocabulary terms.

Where Did Viruses Come From? | Eons

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There are fossils of viruses, of sorts, preserved in the DNA of the hosts that they’ve infected. Including you. This molecular fossil trail can help us understand where viruses came from, how they evolved and it can even help us tackle the biggest question of all: Are viruses alive?

Cheese by the Numbers: 0

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Is it safe to make cheese from unpasteurized milk? Find out in this episode of Cheese Cubed!

The Spread of Disease | STEAM: Ideas That Shape Our World

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Science journalist Sonia Shah explains the history of microbes that cause widespread disease outbreaks. Using cholera as an example, she explains how a microbial disease can become pandemic. She also tracks contemporary epidemics of Ebola, West Nile virus, and Lyme disease, and identifies habitat disruption and crowding as major threats. She spoke as part of the 2016 IdeaFestival in Louisville, Ky.

It’s the Pits!/NC Science Now

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Discover why wearing deodorants and antiperspirants not only affect your social life, they change the microbial life on your body.

Single-Celled Organisms

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They're neither plants nor animals, yet they are some of the most important life forms on Earth. This video segment explores the world of single-celled organisms--what they eat, how they move, what they have in common, and what distinguishes them from one another.

What's up with Your Gut Microbiome? | Our Hungry Planet

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Did you know that fungi, bacteria, and viruses make up a rich ecosystem inside of our bodies? Explore this microscopic ecosystem that inhabits all of us, and learn how we can treat a gut microbiome gone awry.

This video is part of a larger unit in the California Academy of Sciences' Flipside Science series: Our Hungry Planet: Food for a Growing Population

The PREDICT Project | Spillover - Zika, Ebola & Beyond: Part 9

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See Jonna Mazet's innovative PREDICT Project in action. PREDICT is a worldwide effort to use animal surveillance to monitor viruses, proactively preventing and containing outbreaks of infectious disease by identitifying points of contamination early on.

White Island | Big Pacific: Violent

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White Island sits 30 miles off the coast of New Zealand. This is an active volcano, 150,000 years old and still steaming. Cracks in the volcano called fumaroles allow sulphurous gases to escape and crystalize. The volcano’s crater lake reaches 122 degrees Fahrenheit and has a pH of 1, signifying its extreme acidity and inability to sustain human, plant, or animal life. But White Island is not entirely uninhabitable: primitive microbes known as extremophiles live in the crater lake, giving it a distinctive bright green color.

Tiny Clues to Antarctica's Past

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ANDRILL's rock cores reveal evidence of changing climate and ice conditions in Antarctica's past. Within the cores are ocean fossils – some easily seen, others microscopic. Watch this video to learn how the biggest discoveries come from the tiny clues: diatoms and forams.

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