microorganisms

The Truth about Fake Blood | Frankenstein, MD: Episode 2

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Victoria demonstrates the use of E. coli bacteria in the creation of synthetic blood. By altering the genetic make-up of E. coli, bioligists can use the spliced genes in the synthesis of everything from vaccines to biofuels and even the hemoglobin in human blood. There are complications with using this synthetic blood as a complete substitute in human bodies, but Victoria is hoping to excel beyond these roadblocks. 

The Strange Location of Your Second Brain | BrainCraft

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The trillions of bacteria in your gut have more of a relationship with your brain than you may realize. Learn more about your gut-brain in this episode.

These 'Resurrection Plants' Spring Back to Life in Seconds | Deep Look

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Rain falls and within seconds dried-up moss that's been virtually dead for decades unfurls in an explosion of green. The microscopic creatures living in the moss come out to feed.

Old & Odd: Archaea, Bacteria & Protists | Crash Course Biology

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Hank teaches us about the single-celled organisms that make up two of the three taxonomic domains of life and one of the four kingdoms: archaea, bacteria, and protists. They are by far the most abundant organisms on Earth and are our oldest, oddest relatives.

Cheese by the Numbers: 571.3

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Do you know how many pounds of cheese are sold in the US every year? (Hint: it's not a low number!) Also, when is cheese mold good, and when is it bad? Find out in this episode of Cheese Cubed!

Good Sleep = Good Gut? | Braincraft

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Each of us has one trillion microbes living on (or inside) our bodies.

Global Change: Reading Ocean Fossils | Smithsonian Science How

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See how microscopic organisms that most people have never seen are useful. Meet Dr. Brian Huber, paleobiologist at the National Museum of Natural History. Brian specializes on tiny organisms called foraminifera (forams) that are great indicators of global changes. Take a journey with Brian into the stories forams tell about conditions on Earth millions of years ago. Watch how fossilized forams are collected from deep oceans and Antarctic ice. Visit an icy place that used to be warm enough for marine reptiles. Consider what Brian's findings suggest for future conditions on Earth, including global climate.

Fernan Lake Invasion | Idaho Science Journal

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For more than 100 days a year, Fernan Lake falls under health warnings because of toxic blue-green algae blooms. Resident Marc Andrews says you could see the lake turning color. “It’s starting to look more like pea soup instead of water.” Lake managers and residents turned to scientists from the MILES project at the University of Idaho to help them understand what was happening.

The Quest for Clean Water | How We Got to Now: Clean

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Discover how John Leal found the solution to ridding bacteria from dirty water with chlorine at the turn of the 20th century in this clip from How We Got to Now. Support Materials include a background essay on the history of attempts to rid water of bacteria, teaching tips to foster innovation and bring concepts from this clip into the social studies, science, and math classrooms, as well as pre-viewing and post-viewing discussion questions.

Bubonic Plague

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This video segment from A Science Odyssey recounts the tactics employed by San Francisco's health officials to prevent bubonic plague from reaching America's West Coast. Using physical examinations, quarantines, and deportation, city officials hoped to isolate disease-carrying immigrants from the general population. They also disinfected people and fumigated properties where disease-carrying rodents were thought to exist. Following the 1906 earthquake, medical research began to consider rats, rather than humans, as the vector responsible for transmitting the disease. Scientists in India discovered that, in fact, it was the fleas carried by rats that were ultimately responsible for transmitting bubonic plague from diseased rats to humans.

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