Music

Acting in Vocal Performance

Icon: 
Streaming icon

A young performer is preparing a well-known and challenging song in this video adapted from Broadway or Bust. She works with a coach to find a successful way to connect to the song and accommodate her type of voice and temperament. He suggests specific ideas to think about while singing and uses a scene partner to help her build the interpretation.

Strange Fruit: A Song Born of Protest

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This video segment explores how the song Strange Fruit became one of the best known and most enduring songs of protest. In 1939, the legendary blues singer Billie Holiday performed the song as a daring criticism of the commonplace practice of the lynching of African-Americans. Civil rights groups such as the NAACP had made countless appeals, but it was Holiday’s haunting rendition that made it impossible for white Americans and lawmakers to ignore the widespread crime.

Creating Vodcasts | Media Arts Toolkit

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Music educator Michelle Lewis teaches her students how to create vodcast music lessons. Lewis hopes that their vodcast YouTube channel will help students in schools without a music program learn music concepts.

African Dance Field Trip

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Penny and the KidVision Kids learn about West African dance and music. They listen to a storyteller, make and wear traditional dance attire, play dundun drums and dance the Lamba, and watch a professional performance by Delou Africa!

Alabama Blues: The Real Deal

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Meet Carroline Shines, a blues singer and the daughter of the late Johnny Shines, a famous delta blues singer from Tuscaloosa, Alabama who was filmed at The Sucharnochee Revue in Livingston, Alabama. This video shows Carroline sharing her musical talents as a mentor for the Alabama Blues Project, a music program in Tuscaloosa that introduces youth to the historical and cultural significance of blues music. Alabama's many contributions to blues music are discussed.

How Circus Bands Spread African American Music | The Circus

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Discover how cornet player and bandleader P. G. Lowery helped bring the music of black musicians into mainstream popular culture in the early 20th century, in this digital video from The Circus: AMERICAN EXPERIENCE. Lowery, who grew up in a musical family, trained at the prestigious Boston Conservatory of Music. At a time when American society limited opportunities for blacks, the traveling circus provided Lowery and other black musicians with better treatment and guaranteed pay.

Creating Podcasts | Media Arts Toolkit

Icon: 
Streaming icon

As an English/digital media teacher at Henry Clay High School in Lexington, Kentucky, Jason Behler has found that his students become deeply engaged when creating their own podcasts, especially because he allows them great freedom in selecting their own genre and content. His students develop skills in collaboration and time management as well as technical and communication skills. Podcasting does not need to be confined to a class in digital media, and it does not require expensive equipment. Podcasting can be integrated into any content area to add spark to your lessons.

Hawaiian Dance Field Trip

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Aloha! Penny and the KidVision kids learn about Hawaiian art, dance, and music. We find Hawaii on a map, make leis, learn to hula and play the ukulele, and go to a luau! Come with us and make your end-of-year luau a learning experience!

Jazz: The Role of Brass Bands

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Listen to a discussion about cultural performances and festivals, and hear Marcus Johnson and the Bay City Brass Band perform "Just A Closer Walk with Thee." This presentation was filmed at the Alabama Department of Archives and History as part of the ArchiTreats lecture series.

Dream Land | Little Rock's West 9th Street

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Little Rock, Arkansas's West 9th Street was once a vibrant, African-American business and entertainment district. Taborian Hall is the only remaining historic structure on West 9th Street and stands as a living witness of the street's former glory days. Throughout the 1920s and 1930s, Taborian Hall housed varied and important black businesses, including professional offices, a USO, the Gem Pharmacy and the Dreamland Ballroom. By the 1930s, Dreamland was firmly established as a stop on the "Chitlin Circuit," which showcased regional and national African-American bands and stage shows. It was also host to local musicians, dances, socials, concerts and sporting events. 

This documentary seeks to recognize, memorialize and share this history. The spirit and hard work of the people and the implications of federal programs such as Urban Renewal, school desegregation, the Housing Act of 1949 and the Eisenhower Interstate Program are explored. West 9th Street and the Dreamland Ballroom have patiently waited for their story to unfold so new audiences can connect to their historical past and unknown future. 

Major funding for the film was provided by the Arkansas Humanities Council and The Moving Image Trust Fund. 

In 2018, "Dreamland: Little Rock's West 9th Street" received a Bronze Documentary Telly Award.

For further information on Dream Land: Little Rock's West 9th Street, please visit AETN's Dream Land Webpage

Pages