natural resources

The Food Chain

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Alfalfa is sold to a dairy, the dairy feeds it to the cows......those cows will produce milk, that milk will be hauled to town and turned into bottled milk, ice cream, cheese, yogurt, butter, all kinds of dairy products that are sold throughout the state. We use a lot of water to grow these crops and so the real consumer of that water is the public, when they buy and consume the food.

Field Research on Glacial Change

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This ThinkTV segment demonstrates how scientists take measurements in the field to gain an overall understanding of the relationships between climate, populations, and water requires years of field research.

Sustainable Pacific Island Watersheds

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Explore Pacific Island watersheds in these videos adapted from the Secretariat of the Pacific Community. In the first video, Micronesians explain how important a balanced ecosystem is to their culture and livelihoods. We learn that changes to the Nett watershed on the island of Pohnpei are harming the water supply, coral reefs, and fisheries, and that climate change may further threaten these resources. By working together to manage the watershed and the human activities that affect it, Micronesians can improve both public and environmental health. The animation describes the three zones that make up a high island watershed.

Whose Air Do You Share? | It's Okay to Be Smart

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Here's an amazing thought: every time you breathe, you could be sharing air with everyone who's ever lived. A few million of the same air molecules that enter your lungs in a lifetime also entered Albert Einstein or Marie Curie's lungs! That's some smart air. All the air that keeps us alive is just a thin candy shell around our planet. In this episode, echoing the words of John F. Kennedy, Joe Hanson, host of It's Okay to Be Smart, shows you the science of how we all share the same air.

Why Is California Sinking? (Hint: Drought)

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Learn why California's four-year drought is causing it to sink with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from October 7, 2015.

Induced Seismicity: Man-Made Earthquakes

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In this QUEST video produced by KQED, learn about the historic connection between energy mining and earthquakes, and get an explanation of the hydrofracture and enhanced geothermal system processes. In addition, discover the local effects of human-generated earthquakes and learn about the earthquake risk at The Geysers.

Agua: Fuente de Vida | Nature Works Everywhere

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As water travels across our planet, it shapes our environment, connects all living things, and is critical for survival. But how does our water get from its source to its destination, and what does it encounter along the way? This video follows the journey of water to find out how one city, Bogotá, gets water from its source in Chingaza National Park and the surrounding páramo ecosystem. Along the way, students learn about the people and communities whose health and well-being depend on this vital resource.

FRONTLINE: Heat | Global Warming Threatens World Water Supply

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This video segment adapted from FRONTLINE: Heat explains the important role glaciers play in storing and distributing freshwater in many parts of the world. Because of global warming, glaciers are melting more rapidly than normal. This is especially significant for Himalayan and Tibetan glaciers, which feed several major rivers that flow through China and the Indian subcontinent, and sustain agriculture, livestock, and the human population. As glaciers disappear, consequences of water scarcity will likely include drought and political instability between nations.

Scientist Profile: Hydrologist

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This DragonflyTV segment introduces hydrologic technician Vidal Mendoza, who gathers information about rivers and water flow. He uses this data to advise local and state level government on water levels, and makes conservation recommendations. Also available in Spanish.

Water: The Lifeblood | History of Energy is the Story of Water

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As a civilization, people have been using water to provide energy in turning wheels, making steam, and in turbines. 

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