natural resources

Why Only 9 Countries Have Nuclear Weapons | Above the Noise

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North Korea has been making headlines recently, mostly due to its nuclear weapons. In early January, the country’s leader, Kim Jong-un, boasted of his ability to reach the U.S. with nuclear-armed missiles. Then in March -- in an apparent 180 -- he told South Korean officials that he would be willing to negotiate with the U.S. to completely denuclearize. What are the rules that govern who has nukes and who doesn’t? And why do some countries maintain huge nuclear arsenals, while many other countries don’t have any nukes? Joe Hanson of It's OK to Be Smart joins host Myles Bess to investigate.

Growing Appetites, Limited Resources

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In this video from NOVA’s Energy Lab, learn about the growing demand for energy and the impacts of energy use. Currently, the majority of the world’s energy comes from fossil fuels, which are limited resources. The burning of fossil fuels releases carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas that pollutes the atmosphere and affects Earth's climate. A sustainable future depends on finding alternative energy sources and developing new technologies that can support increasing energy demand and minimize environmental impacts.

This video is available in both English and Spanish audio, along with corresponding closed captions.

SciGirls | Blowin' in the Wind 02: Test

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When doing scientific investigations with many variables it's important to keep track of all of them and only change one at a time. The SciGirls are investigating wind turbine blades to figure out which produce the most energy and are careful to change only one variable at a time.

Global Warming: The Developing World

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Thanks to technology, the world is changing faster than ever before. Unfortunately, many of these changes are probably having a negative impact on the global climate. This video segment adapted from NOVA/FRONTLINE takes a look at what the future might hold for the environment as a result of the expanding use of technology.

Reducing Food Waste | Our Hungry Planet

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Did you know that the average American creates 20 lbs of food waste per month? You'll be surprised by all the things you can do to pitch in to help reduce the amount of food we waste.

This video is part of a larger unit in the California Academy of Sciences' Flipside Science series: Our Hungry Planet: Food for a Growing Population

Energy for a Developing World

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In this video, meet an entrepreneur who is bringing solar energy to Bangladesh. Since 1976, Muhammad Yunus has been dedicated to fighting poverty and empowering women in Bangladesh and the world. He recognizes the importance of energy as a factor in economic growth for the poor people of Bangladesh. In 1996, Yunus started Grameen Shakti, a not-for-profit company, to promote, develop and popularize renewable energy technologies in remote areas of Bangladesh. By focusing on solar, biogas, and other forms of renewable energy, Grameen Shakti sees a future where rural households will have access to reliable, environmentally friendly energy at affordable costs.

Resourcefulness | Evaluating the Energy Impacts of Shifts in Residential Water Heating

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This is a video abstract of the academic research paper "Evaluating the Energy and CO2 Emissions Impacts of Shifts in Residential Water Heating in the United States," originally published in Energy. Watching the video serves a dual purpose of introducing students to the multi-layered and interconnected nature of energy and water and to the various different avenues for science communication.

What Is Soil?

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Learn about soil and why it is one of Earth’s most important natural resources, in these videos from NASA eClips and NOVA. Most plants and animals rely on the water and nutrients stored in soil for survival. There are many different types of soil, and each one contains different levels of living and nonliving materials. Soils that are rich in water and nutrients allow plants to grow and animals to have food and shelter. NASA scientists use information sent from satellites to study the soil and soil moisture so they can help us better understand our planet.

To view the Background Essay, Student Handouts, and Teaching Tips for this media gallery, go to Support Materials below. This resource was developed through WGBH’s Bringing the Universe to America’s Classrooms project, in collaboration with NASA. Click here for the full collection of resources.

Managing Carbon Dioxide: The Geologic Solution - The World's Finest Fire Extinguisher

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The discovery of natural underground CO2 deposits in New Mexico.

Structural Deficit

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Since 2000, in the current drought, we've seen Lake Mead decline by more than a hundred feet in elevation. Some would say, well that's the sign of the drought and it's true in part. But the normal amount, and I put quotes around that, the "normal" amount of water, eight and a quarter million acre feet or more was released from Lake Powell every year to Lake Mead, and yet Lake Mead dropped every year. The reason that we have this structural deficit and the reason that we're heading this way is because we're not charging those evaporative losses in Lake Mead.

 

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