natural resources

What's In the Water

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In recent news reports, it has been said that various traces of pharmaceuticals have been recovered in the Chesapeake Bay and other Maryland water ways, including even some tap water. These traces are called PPCPs and according to research have been showing up in Maryland water for over a decade. Currently, testing and research is being done to find out at what risk PPCPs are putting on wildlife and humans.

Hydrocarbon Power! | Crash Course Chemistry

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In which Hank introduces us to the world of Organic Chemistry and, more specifically, the power of hydrocarbon. He talks about the classifications of organic compounds, the structures & properties of alkanes, isomers, and naming an alkane by observing its structure.

Career Spotlight: Water Quality Specialist

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How do things we build impact our environment? Melanie Harrison is a water quality specialist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Marine Fisheries Services. Her job is to conserve and protect fish species that are threatened or endangered. Melanie addresses different stressors on the environment and their impact on species, like how it affects their spawning time and locations. She also evaluates projects in the Central Valley that impact species in their critical habitat.

Water Treatment Plant

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In most parts of the United States, getting clean, safe water is as easy as turning on a faucet. Generally, this water comes from either groundwater or nearby streams and reservoirs. What most of us never see or have to worry about are the steps required to make this water drinkable. In this video segment adapted from ZOOM, cast member Noreen finds out how a water treatment facility in Cambridge, Massachusetts purifies its city's water.

Water: The Lifeblood | Coal as a Water Source?

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Coal Creek Station near Underwood, North Dakota is able to remove the water from the lignite they mine and then use that water in their cooling towers. They have also been able to see an increase in the plant’s efficiency by doing this. 

Solar Car

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Isaac and Anjali measure the power of the Sun using a solar-powered car, in this video from DragonflyTV. Using a systematic approach and careful observation and measurement, they uncover some of the shortcomings of solar power that have kept it from being a perfect replacement for oil and natural gas—especially as a power source for cars.

Biofuels: Beyond Ethanol

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In this video from QUEST produced by KQED, students learn the process by which plant matter is converted into fuel, which types of plants scientists are investigating as potential fuel sources, and the possible downsides to using these new materials for fuel.

NOVA scienceNOW: Capturing Carbon

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This video from NOVA scienceNOW explains how geophysicist Klaus Lackner and two engineers, Allen and Burton Wright, teamed up to develop a technology to capture an important greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide (CO2), in the air. Modeling their design after a tree—and one of Lackner's daughter's science experiments—the team tested different materials, configurations, and coatings that together would act as leaves do to remove CO2 from the air. However, instead of mimicking photosynthesis, their process uses a manufactured fabric that attracts CO2 and pulls it out of the air for subsequent storage.

From Waste to Watts

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A new source of energy is coming from neither the sun nor the wind but from a dairy farm. In this video from QUEST produced by KQED, learn how a new project can transform gourmet waste from restaurants into green power.

Geothermal Energy: Harnessing the Power of the Earth

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Geothermal energy is a renewable energy source produced from the heat inside Earth. In this video from KQED, discover how it is produced and its limitations.

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