Plants

Flood Plain and Higher Ground Habitats | NatureScene

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In this video segment from NatureScene, take a tour of the Congaree Swamp National Park to learn about where the high-ground and floodplain environments meet. The boundary between dry and semi-saturated ground supports a diversity of plants, including loblolly pines and beech trees on higher ground, as well as understory plants such as doghobble and cinnamon fern. Decomposers like mushrooms, which are also understory plants, help to break down and cycle nutrients back into the soil. Plant habitat and adaptation here are predominantly influenced by soil type and saturation.

This video is available in both English and Spanish audio, along with corresponding closed captions.

Rare Nebraska Featuring the Rainwater Basin

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As a companion to NET’s The PlainStory podcast, NET has produced a set of immersive, experiential videos designed to give viewers a taste of rare Nebraskan habitats via 360 video and audio. We recommend viewing these using the Chrome browser and using headphones to get the full audio effect. We also recommend checking out The PlainStory podcast at plainstorypodcast.org, or wherever great podcasts are downloaded.

NOVA | The Reproductive Role of Flowers

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This video segment adapted from NOVA explains how flowers play a central role in the reproductive cycle of plants. Their striking array of colors, patterns, fragrances, and nectar all require lots of energy to produce. But it is these features that attract insects and other animals, which, in turn, carry genetic material from flower to flower. The video and illustration describe various parts of the reproductive system, including the stamens and pistil, which generate seeds and ensure the survival of an enormous variety of plant species.

Forecasting Suitable Habitat for Redwoods | Clue Into Climate

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With this video slideshow and accompanying lessons from Clue into Climate, produced by KQED, students learn that plants and animals must be able to adapt or move in order to survive significant environmental changes. Students also investigate how climate models are used to predict how species distributions may change as the planet warms.

Do Plants Think? | It's Okay to Be Smart

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For the last 50 years we've wondered whether plants can think... Haven't we?

How Plants Defend Themselves

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In this video segment from Nature: "What Plants Talk About," ecologist Ian Baldwin explains the many different and highly sophisticated ways in which plants, like wild tobacco, have adapted to identify and defend themselves from predators in hostile and often unfamiliar environments.

History's Most Powerful Plants | Eons

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Fossil fuels are made from the remains of extinct organisms that have been exposed to millions of years of heat and pressure. But in the case of coal, these organisms consisted largely of some downright bizarre plants that once covered the Earth, from Colorado to China.

Harvesting Plants in Space

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Find out how researchers and astronauts teamed up to study the growth of an ordinary plant in space—and why that impacts farming back on Earth—in this video from SciTech Now partner Science Friday. Students will explore two contrasting ideas about how plants and their roots grow in the absence of gravity, discover new factors that influence plant growth and design their own space farming experiment.

Citrus Greening Disease | America's Heartland

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Discover the impact of citrus greening disease on Florida's citrus trees and, potentially, its economy, and examine what's being done to stop the spread of the disease.

Flight of the Pollinators - Clips | Wild Kratts

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Join Chris and Martin as they explore the process of pollination and learn the important partnership between plants and animals. Watch the accompanying clips to see how Chris and Martin uncover the amazing delivery system of plants and their animal partners.

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