Professional Development

Where Is All the Water in the World? l MEECS Water Quality: Video Lesson 2

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Students work together in groups to estimate the distribution of water in the various locations on Earth, where it is found, and discover how much fresh water is available on Earth for human use. Students answer these essential questions: Where is water found on Earth? Is there enough water on Earth for everyone? Why are the Great Lakes unique? (This video lesson highlights activity 5 from lesson 1 of the MEECS Water Quality Unit.)

MEECS Air Quality l Local Sources of Air Pollution: Video Lesson 6

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This lesson looks at the sources of air pollutants. Students examine the sources of air pollutants (point, mobile, area, and natural). Go outdoors with MEECS in this lesson! (This video lesson highlights activities 1 and 2 from lesson 3 of the MEECS Air Quality Unit.)

MEECS Air Quality l Reactants and Products of Combustion: Video Lesson 3

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Paper models are used to help students understand what happens during combustion and what this has to do with air pollution. (This video lesson highlights activity 5 from lesson 1 of the MEECS Air Quality Unit.)

 

Judge Mathis Says to Find Your Talent | Dropping Back In

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Learn why Judge Greg Mathis says that most people in poverty experience hopelessness and despair, and the way to beat that is to find your own special talent, then work hard and compete, in this video from the Dropping Back In series. Judge Greg Mathis dropped out of high school, earned a GED® diploma, and got into college with help from a cousin. College didn't go well until he realized he wasn't good at math and science but he had a gift for liberal arts. He changed his focus to law, found his courses were a better fit for his talents, worked hard, got into law school, and launched a successful career. He tells adult learners, “that first step gives you the confidence to the next step, and every step thereafter, you feel a sense of achievement.”

 

Creating a Culture of Questioning

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In this video from Making the Case, classroom teachers and math education experts focus on the role of questions and discussion in their classroom. In specific, they describe how questions can encourage argumentation and critique, rather than just eliciting correct or incorrect answers in an evaluative way. Classroom examples also illuminate this Common Core Standard for Mathematical Practice in action.

Ideas in Action: Build Student Vocabulary

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In this video, pre-calculus teacher Chris Luzniak from the Urban Assembly School for Law and Justice in Brooklyn, NY explains his focus on asking students to use precise mathematical vocabulary in their arguments. He provides vocabulary for the math tasks to his students, makes it visible in the classroom on word walls, and insists that students use this language in argumentation, supporting the Common Core Standards for Mathematical Process.

Argumentation and Review

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This video from Making the Case shows how teacher Nina Vasquez structures test review in her 12th grade AP Statistics Class at Everett Alvarez Jr. High School in Salinas CA. As her students work in groups and do peer grading, they both review and solidify their content knowledge, and refine their skill in making and critiquing arguments, supporting the Common Core Standards for Mathematical Practice.

Title I Conference | 180 Days: Hartsville

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Thornwell is one of the best schools in their district in Hartsville, SC, but when the educators compete with others nation wide, do they make the grade?

Utilizing Right and Wrong Answers

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In this professional development video excerpted from Getting Results, a community college instructor explains how he reviews a test with his students by having his students work in groups to discuss answers. The instructor explains that while tests can reveal to him what hasn't been grasped, this group review helps his students reflect on the rationale behind each answer. In addition, the tests help him discover whether goals are met, whether there are other benefits to the lesson, and whether he was successful in teaching the lesson. Once he has discovered the answers to these questions, he can decide whether to adjust the course design.

PBCL: Thinking About Evaluation

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With Problem-Based Case Learning (PBCL), students work in teams to develop and present solutions to real-world problems. In this video from Making Learning Real, instructors and a learning scientist discuss ways to evaluate student work in PBCL. One challenge for education is to find a way to evaluate that does not stifle innovation. Another is the need to evaluate how students solve new problems they have never seen before. The solutions that students develop can indicate how well they have learned the material.

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