Programming

SciGirls | Baile Digital 03: Prueba (Test)

Icon: 
Streaming icon

The SciGirls put together all the parts of their program, and test their Sphero and Arduino code with the dancers in a dress rehearsal. The girls find some problems with their program that need to be debugged, and work together to make sure everything is ready for the final performance.

Felecia Davis Profile

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Meet Dr. Felecia Davis in this video from WPSU Penn State’s “Women in Science Profiles” (WiSci Files). Felecia is an Assistant Professor of Architecture at Penn State University who combines art, technology, and science in her work with computational textiles—soft materials that can sense and respond to the world around them. In this video, Felecia talks about computational textiles and more with producer Cheraine Stanford and students from WPSU's viewing area in a live Q&A. This resource is part of the Women in Science Profiles Collection. 

Tutorial Clips: How Plants Grow | PBS KIDS ScratchJr

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This collection of tutorial videos highlight the various programming blocks used in How Plants Grow: Lesson Plan | PBS KIDS ScratchJr. Use this media gallery as a reference as you follow the lesson plan, or when you are creating your own.

The First Programming Languages: Crash Course Computer Science #11

Icon: 
Streaming icon

So we ended last episode with programming at the hardware level with things like plugboards and huge panels of switches, but what was really needed was a more versatile way to program computers - software!

Felecia Davis Chat

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Meet Dr. Felecia Davis in this video from WPSU Penn State’s “Women in Science Profiles” (WiSci Files). Felecia is an Assistant Professor of Architecture at Penn State University  who combines art, technology, and science in her work with computational textiles: soft materials that can sense and respond to the world around them. In this video, Felecia talks about computational textiles and more with producer Cheraine Stanford and students from WPSU's viewing area in a live Q&A. This resource is part of the Women in Science Profiles Collection.

Computers | Science Trek

Icon: 
Streaming icon

The computing power in today’s cell phones is much higher than all the processing power of all the computers on the Apollo 11 Lunar Lander that put two men on the moon. Computers can be found in almost everything. But how does this amazing technology work? On this month’s Science Trek, host Joan Cartan-Hansen and her guests will answer students’ questions about computers.

NASA | Colliding Neutron Stars Create Black Hole and Gamma-ray Burst

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This video from NASA describes the detailed computer modeling used to predict that colliding neutron stars can produce gamma-ray bursts similar to those associated with black holes. Building on prior models showing that colliding neutron stars could themselves produce a black hole, the video captures cutting-edge research being addressed through modeling, simulation, and visualization.

How Does Glitchy Art Show Us Broken Is Beautiful? | PBS Idea Channel

Icon: 
Streaming icon

You may have noticed "glitches," where people purposely push machines to malfunction and therefore create fascinating "mistakes." Instead of being frustrated and disdainful of these errors as we usually do when our technology fails mid-workflow, we find them to be bizarrely beautiful. Why are we so interested in these images, music, or objects that are structurally or formally broken? 

What is Coding | PBS KIDS ScratchJr

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Explore our definition of coding and what it looks like to code with PBS KIDS ScratchJr.

The Origami Revolution | Predicting How Proteins Fold

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Explore how origami, the age-old tradition of paper folding, is analogous to one of the hardest problems in biology today—predicting a protein’s folded shape—in this video from NOVA: The Origami Revolution. A protein’s specific three-dimensional shape determines its function in the body. Failure to fold correctly can lead to disease. Because protein folding is essential for life, scientists are trying to predict which shapes, out of trillions of possibilities, are the most stable. To do so, they use computers to simulate the ways different protein sequences could fold and the shapes these could produce. This resource is part of the NOVA Collection.

Pages