Relationships

Minding the Gap | Lesson Plan Clips

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Minding the Gap is a coming of age film by Bing Liu. Starting in high school, Bing begins to make skate videos. What starts as a hobby ends up as a profound exploration of issues that is likely to resonate deeply with students.

The diverse group of participants in the film — Bing, Keire, Zack, and Nina — see and feel the often jarring challenges of life in a small, declining Rust Belt city. Collectively, they experience family violence, substance abuse, economic insecurity, racism, and teen pregnancy, along with the typical struggles of identity formation as teens become adults. To cope, they skate — regulating the speed at which they move through life, attacking obstacles and flipping over platforms, sometimes unsuccessfully. The risks they take are sometimes rewarded and sometimes the source of pain. But they persevere.

ACE - Adverse Childhood Experiences

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In these videos, students will learn about how early exposure to family violence, abusive treatment, neglect, alcohol and drug abuse, or separated/divorced parents can lead to health and social problems, risk-taking behaviors, and a shortened lifespan. Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) can last a lifetime, but they don't have to. Safe, stable, and nurturing relationships and communities can break the cycle of abuse and maltreatment.

Is Love All You Need? | BrainCraft

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What is the key to happiness and satisfaction in life? One study followed a group of people for more than 70 years to find out.

Does Being Popular in High School Really Matter? | Above the Noise

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When you’re in high school, it can seem like being popular is the most important thing in the world. But being popular in high school tends to have adverse outcomes once someone enters early adulthood. It all depends on what type of popularity someone has because it turns out there are two types. They are status and likability. Find out what happens to the popular high school kids after they graduate in the latest Above the Noise episode.

Film Clip 1 | Mimi and Dona

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In this clip, we meet the title characters of the film Mimi and Dona. It is obvious right away that they have a very special and very close relationship. We follow Mimi and Dona as they go about their daily lives. They spend their time going to the salon, enjoying meals, and watching their favorite television programs together.

Does Technology Ruin Relationships? | BrainCraft

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How does our excessive use of technology and social media affect our relationship with other people?

Happy Healthy Kids | Amazing Us!

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In this episode of Happy Healthy Kids, Miss Kelsey helps kids reflect on how our differences make us extra special. Comparing our likes and dislikes leads us to identify connections with each other and recognize how beautiful and awesome we are!

Clip #2 | Real Boy Film Module

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In this excerpt from the Independent Lens film Real Boy, trans teenager Bennett talks to friend Joe Stevens, a trans folk singer, about trying to grow a beard and how to groom it when it finally does come. Bennett may just have “one chin hair at the moment” but Joe does give him a nifty new haircut as they talk about how they had “girls’ haircuts” forced on them as kids.

ARTHUR | So Funny I Forgot to Laugh (Video)

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Find out what happens when Arthur’s friendly teasing goes too far in this in this video from the PBS children’s series ARTHUR. Arthur teases Sue Ellen about her new sweater even after Sue Ellen and their other friends ask him to stop. Arthur finally realizes he was wrong, but can he find a way to apologize to Sue Ellen and save their friendship?

This video can be used with The AIM Buddy Project | An ARTHUR Social, Emotional, and Character Development Curriculum.

Trust: Second Acts in Young Lives

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Trust: Second Acts in Young Lives is the true story of 18-year-old Marlin, from Honduras, who survives sexual abuse, immigration to the United States, and substance abuse. Most of the story takes place at APTP, the Albany Park Theater Project in Chicago. APTP is an after-school theater program that makes plays out of people’s real-life stories. This is a documentary—the kids in the film are not actors. Marlín’s story has difficult themes but nothing graphic. The focus is on how the other youth turn her story into a play.

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