Safety

Playground Field Trip

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Penny and the KidVision VPK Kids visit the playground!  They learn playground safety rules and how to pump on the swing, climb the monkey bars and play hopscotch. Ready, Set, GO!  It’s Playground Time!

Concussions: Answers in the Blood? | Research

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Concussions are a type of injury that might affect a person’s brain – usually it is a temporary condition, but current research is being conducted to see if there are tests or markers that can identify more long-term effects. Any type of jolt to the head can cause a concussion and students need to know that concussions can occur outside the sports setting. Current emphasis in the NFL is shining the light on long-term effects for their players. In fact the NFL and GE are providing funding for research that might improve diagnosis, long term care, or treatment. One such project is being conducted at the University of Montana: its purpose is to determine if there are specific markers in the blood that can determine if there have been changes to the brain due to concussions. This video follows that research. There are also two clips that document the stories of two students who experience concussions. Watching those videos is part of the “before viewing” activity.

Fire Station Field Trip

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Penny and the KidVision VPK Kids visit the fire station, where they learn about the parts of the fire truck, tour the station house, learn the importance of a fire drill and exit signs and demonstrate how to "Stop, Drop, and Roll."

Concussions: Answers in the Blood? | Paytons's Story

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Payton’s story is designed to put a face to the Concussion: Answers in the blood? video about concussion research being conducted at the University of Montana. Payton is a collegiate soccer player who has been diagnosed with concussion and this clip follows her story. She ultimately decides to return to her sport. 

Tell an Adult

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Sometimes we see something on the Internet that makes us feel uncomfortable. This can happen when we are playing a game on the Internet or perhaps even talking to someone on the phone. When this happens we need to tell an adult we trust. An adult we can trust may be a grandparent, teacher, mom, dad or police officer.

League of Denial: What Causes CTE?

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Learn about one scientist’s hypothesis that “just playing the game” places young football players at risk of chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE, in this video from FRONTLINE: League of Denial. This video is featured in the interactive lesson Is Football Safe for Kids. Use the lesson to learn more about how children's brains are impacted differently and to write down your responses to evidence that football may be unsafe for young children. For background on CTE, watch Introduction to CTE and review How CTE Affects the Brain. This resource is part of the FRONTLINE Collection.

QUEST | Lesson Plan Clips

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Significant trauma, including witnessing or experiencing violence, is a fact of life for many students. Left unaddressed, that trauma can be an obstacle to learning. Teachers, who are typically asked to focus on cognitive rather than affective learning, sometimes feel ill-equipped to help students process their experiences. This lesson provides a curriculum-connected place to start. 

In the lesson students gain an intuitive sense of the difference between affective and cognitive brain functions. They are asked to use both art and expository writing to respond to clips from the documentary film QUEST. The family shown in the film uses community connections, politics and art to cope when their youngest daughter, PJ, is shot—caught in crossfire on the streets of North Philadelphia. As students compare and contrast responses, they understand the role that affective pursuits, like artistic expression, can play in the healing process.

Gymnastics Field Trip

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Join Penny and the KidVision VPK Kids at Miami Gymnastics Academy!  They stretch, run and jump on the tumble track, act like animals on the balance beam, lift their bodies on the bars, and learn rhythmic gymnastics. This field trip wins a gold medal!

League of Denial: Introduction to CTE

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Learn how the 2002 death of one of football’s greatest linemen helped bring to light a rare disease, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, in this video from FRONTLINE: League of Denial. In 1991, "Iron Mike" Webster retired after 17 years in football and thousands of hits to his helmet. Soon after, he and his family suspected that playing football had taken a devastating toll on his brain. After Webster died, pathologist Bennet Omalu examined Webster’s brain tissue. His findings suggested that repetitive brain trauma causes an abnormal protein ("tau") to accumulate in the brain. This was the first evidence that playing football could cause a progressive neurodegenerative disease that results in permanent brain damage. This resource is part of the FRONTLINE Collection.

Cyber-bullying

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Cyber-bullying is where one or more children targets another through technology such as the Internet, cell phones, or other devices to threaten, harass, or embarrass another child. Cyber-bullying goes beyond just bullying, because it can follow you home (e.g., through text or e-mail messages, blogs, social networking web site, etc.). You can stop cyber-bullying by not responding to any of it, saving the evidence, and reporting it.

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