Science

Animal Families | Everyday Learning

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Families are our introduction to society. By living and growing within a small connected group, we are prepared for encounters with larger groups within society. Animal families provide a great example of similarities and differences within various family groups. This video is available in both English and Spanish audio, along with corresponding closed captions.

Becoming Green Energy Experts

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This Michigan State University/Lansing Boys and Girls Club partnership demonstrates the powerful result of giving youth the science background and tools they need to carry out investigations of their own design, and to communicate their knowledge in their own voice.

How to Manage Group Exploration of the Outdoors | PLUM LANDING

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Join Outdoor Educator Jessie Scott as he shares his strategies for exploring the outdoors with a crowd in this video from PLUM LANDING. As Jessie explains, managing a large group during outdoor exploration can be overwhelming – but it’s easier than you might think to keep things on track. Key strategies include setting the stage; redirecting disruptive children, keeping things interesting; and knowing where everyone is at all times.

MEECS Energy Resources l Energy Mix: Video Lesson 5

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Students investigate different energy resources used to generate electricity in Michigan through exploration of a Michigan map and the EIA website. (This video lesson highlights activities 6 and 7 (option A) from lesson 3 of the MEECS Energy Resources Unit.)

MEECS Energy Resources l Investigating the Generation of Electricity: Video Lesson 4

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Students investigate energy generation through a hands-on activity and take part in a discussion about how a turbine and generator transform electricity. (This video lesson highlights activity 1 from lesson 3 of the MEECS Energy Resources Unit.)

Storm Water Metaphor l MEECS Water Quality: Video Lesson 9

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Students identify common pollutants in storm water and answer the following essential questions: Where does storm water come from and where does it go? What contaminants may be in storm water runoff? How do people affect the quantity and quality of runoff? (This video lesson highlights activity 2 from lesson 8 of the MEECS Water Quality Unit.)

 

MEECS Air Quality l Local Sources of Air Pollution: Video Lesson 6

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This lesson looks at the sources of air pollutants. Students examine the sources of air pollutants (point, mobile, area, and natural). Go outdoors with MEECS in this lesson! (This video lesson highlights activities 1 and 2 from lesson 3 of the MEECS Air Quality Unit.)

Visualizing Concepts Through Technology

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In this professional development video from Getting Results, a chemical operations instructor and one of his students discuss how classroom technology can ready students for work in industry. A student tells how a particular technology model in his classroom helps him understand the technology in the field. The class visits a local processing plant where they talk with industry professionals and explore state-of-the-art equipment in action. Finally, the student says that the classroom technology helps him understand this equipment by “boiling it down to the basics.”

How to Engage Kids and Families in Outdoor Science Activities | PLUM LANDING

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Join Outdoor Educator Jessie Scott as he shares his tips for keeping students focused during outdoor science exploration in this video from PLUM LANDING. As Jessie explains, being outdoors can be fun, exciting—and distracting. Tips for keeping things on track include connecting outdoor activities to local ecosystems, building in opportunities for social interation, and , and minimizing time spent sitting and listening.

Food Webs and Food Chains l MEECS Eco Bio Video Lesson 4

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Students work in small groups to identify and label food chains and food webs on the Michigan DNR Non-Game Wildlife posters. Students then connect food chains to develop the concept of food webs. Students answer the essential question: How do living things obtain the energy they need to live? (This video lesson highlights activities 4 and 5 from lesson 2 of the Michigan Environmental Education Curriculum Support (MEECS) Ecosystems and Biodiversity Unit.)

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