Science

Animal Families | Everyday Learning

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Families are our introduction to society. By living and growing within a small connected group, we are prepared for encounters with larger groups within society. Animal families provide a great example of similarities and differences within various family groups. This video is available in both English and Spanish audio, along with corresponding closed captions.

Becoming Green Energy Experts

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This Michigan State University/Lansing Boys and Girls Club partnership demonstrates the powerful result of giving youth the science background and tools they need to carry out investigations of their own design, and to communicate their knowledge in their own voice.

How to Help Families Feel Comfortable in the Outdoors | PLUM LANDING

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Join Outdoor Educator Jessie Scott as he tackles common fears students and families may have about exploring nature in this video from PLUM LANDING. Jessie explains that helping students and families overcome fears about exploring the outdoors is an important part of any outdoor educator’s job. He shares his stratgies for calming common fears and encouraging students and families to feel comfortable in nature.

MEECS Energy Resources l Measuring Heat Loss: Video Lesson 7

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Students explore the efficiency of their school and create a general map of their classroom or school after investigating the temperature in different parts of the school (walls, windows, doors). (This video lesson highlights extension activity 3 from lesson 5 of the MEECS Energy Resources Unit.)

 

 

 

 

Testing Food Chemistry

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In this video segment from Teaching Middle School Life Science, teacher Nanette Respess talks about her students’ experience working in groups as they test liquids and foods for specific nutrients. She explains that group work gives her an opportunity to assess her students, most of whom have been building their scientific knowledge and habits of mind over the past three to four years. As she walks around the classroom, moving from group to group, she seeks to address student weaknesses she has noted in previous activities.

3D Watershed Model l MEECS Water Quality: Video Lesson 4

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In this activity, students observe and participate in the movement of water by labeling the parts of a watershed using a 3D watershed model. Students answer these essential questions: What is a watershed? Why care about watersheds? How does water in your watershed reach the Great Lakes? (This video lesson highlights activity 2 from lesson 3 of the MEECS Water Quality Unit.)

 

MEECS Air Quality l How is Air Pollution Produced?: Video Lesson 2

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A burning candle is used as an introduction to air pollution. Students make observations about the candle that illustrate the chemical and physical changes during combustion. (This video lesson highlights activity 4 from lesson 1 of the MEECS Air Quality Unit.)

Ask a Scientist: Why Did You Become a Scientist?

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This video features Dr. Pat Becerra discussing why she became a scientist, why she likes to study the eye, and encourages girls who are interested in science to pursue their passion. In the National Eye Institute Ask a Scientist video series, NEI scientists answer questions from kids about vision, optical illusions, science careers, and more. If you or your children have questions to ask our scientists, tell us on Twitter! You can tweet your questions to @NatEyeInstitute with the hashtag #AskAScientist.

Analyzing Land Use Changes l MEECS Land Use: Video Lesson 6

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Students inquire about the changing agricultural land use in Michigan. Data for Michigan land use are graphed and analyzed to reveal past changes and project what future changes may occur. (This video lesson highlights activity 3 from lesson 5 of the MEECS Land Use Unit.)

 

Assessing Prior Knowledge of Pond Life

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In this video segment from Teaching Middle School Life Science, master teacher and science education specialist Sally Crissman asks a small group of middle school students what they already know about pond life before starting a new investigation. Crissman emphasizes that assessing prior knowledge is an important part of the learning process. To do this, she asks students questions to gauge their understanding and experience with a subject, and may also have them make predictions about what they might observe. Crissman also talks about the effectiveness of regularly reviewing what students have learned with them before pushing their learning further.

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