Science and Technology

Georgia's Oldest Business | Georgia Stories

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Think of how many different ways we get news and information today. The Internet, television, radio, letters, and conversations are just a few ways. In colonial Georgia, people were just as interested in the news as we are today, but they lacked convenient and fast ways of getting it. In fact, the king forbade Georgia colonists to publish a newspaper for the first 30 years of its existence. Instead, people relied on news from traveling visitors, friends, and through letters and newspapers from other places. Finally in 1763, an act of the legislature allowed publication of a newspaper. James Johnson, a printer from Scotland, was named the royal printer and the Georgia Gazette was born.

J. Alden Loring

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Loring, a naturalist, mammologist and author, had worked for U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, the Smithsonian Institute, and the Bureau of Biological Survey. In 1909 he embarked on an expedition to Africa with President Theodore Roosevelt to collect specimens for a new Natural History Museum.

Alexander Graham Bell | Scientist, Inventor, and Teacher Video

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Alexander Graham Bell devoted his life to helping people—deaf and hearing—communicate. Working tirelessly to integrate the deaf into society—like his pupil Helen Keller—Bell was also an avid inventor. He created numerous communication devices, including the telephone. Using a short video and two primary sources, students will learn about Bell’s inventions and his work with the deaf community.

View the Lesson Plan.

Communication Innovators

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This Media Gallery explores the great advances in long-distance communication that resulted from the innovations of Samuel F. B. Morse, Alexander Graham Bell, and Guglielmo Marconi. Review these images and their descriptions keeping in mind how technology transformed communication over time.

Rivers, Roads, Rails, and Air | Individual Freedom

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Learn about the history of automobiles in North Dakota. The automobile age gave freedom of movement and choice for passengers and freight. With more people driving cars, the push came for better roads.

Rivers, Roads, Rails, and Air | Peerless Transportation

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Learn about the role of railroads in North Dakota history. In their time, railroads had no peer in their ability to move people and goods, although shipping costs were high. The railroad companies helped increase immigration to North Dakota by actively marketing the opportunities here to foreigners, especially Scandinavians and Germans from Russia.

Rivers, Roads, Rails, and Air | Barnstorming

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Learn about early airplanes, and how they were a novelty and flying a source of entertainment for bystanders, but quickly became essential in the transportation of passengers and goods.

Edison: Boyhood and Teen Years

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Find out how young Thomas Edison’s curiosity got him into trouble, and how, during his teen years, he lost his hearing but gained confidence as an aspiring inventor, in this video adapted from AMERICAN EXPERIENCE: Edison. As portrayed through reenactments, we learn that Edison, who had just three months of formal schooling, grew up reading and conducting chemistry experiments. His job as a newsboy on a train inspired his fascination with the telegraph. After teaching himself Morse Code so he could send and receive messages, Edison took a job as a telegraph operator at the age of 15. Through his work, and despite premature hearing loss, he developed an understanding of how the telegraph system operated and how he might improve it. He began to think of himself as an inventor. This resource is part of the Thomas Edison Collection.

Click on the links below to download a customizable Student Handout, Student Reading and transcript for this resource.

Student Handout | Student Reading | Transcript

Edison: Impact of Technology on Society

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Imagine the world when electric light was first introduced, and reflect on the impact that new inventions have on ordinary people in this video adapted from AMERICAN EXPERIENCE: Edison. In late 19th-century America, machines were ushering the country into the modern world. But with the awe and wonder that radical change provoked, technology also brought a certain amount of anxiety to ordinary people. This resource is part of the Thomas Edison CollectionCaution: This video includes the use of the word "hell."

Click on the links below to download a customizable Student Handout, Student Reading, and transcript for this resource.

Student Handout | Student Reading | Transcript

Edison: Invention Laboratory at Menlo Park

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Discover how Thomas Edison’s invention laboratory in Menlo Park, New Jersey, and the team he hired to work with him, all fit into his vision of how he would become a great inventor in this video adapted from AMERICAN EXPERIENCE: Edison. In late 1876, Edison opened a fully equipped 5,000 square foot innovation laboratory that would provide him and a small group of experimental assistants and skilled machinists a place to invent. With all kinds of chemicals, organic materials, scientific instruments, and shop tools available to them, the men worked day and night, intent on figuring out things that nobody had yet thought of. This resource is part of the Thomas Edison Collection.

Click on the links below to download a customizable Student Handout and transcript for this resource.

Student Handout | Transcript

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