Science and Technology

Solve a Problem | Steamboats on the Red

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Learn how the biggest hurdle in establishing a water route for trade was how to get a steamboat across the prairie from St. Paul to the Red River in this video from the Steamboats on the Red series. The solution: a contest proposed by the St. Paul Chamber of Commerce with a cash prize to the first person to get a steamboat launched and operational.

Looking at the shallow twists and turns of the Red River, it’s hard to imagine that steam-powered paddlewheel boats were once the most important transportation link between St. Paul, Minnesota, and Winnipeg, Manitoba. From the first in 1859 to the last that sank in 1909, Red River steamboats hauled thousands of settlers and millions of tons of freight across the border between the United States and Canada. Although it lasted barely 50 years, the age of the steamboat forged a commercial network between the two countries that exists to this day in the Interstate-29 corridor.

Old Red Trail | Birth of the Interstate

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Crossing the United States before the federal highway system was in place was very difficult.  Future President Dwight Eisenhower traveled in a military expedition from Maryland to California in 1919 and took that experience with him to the White House.  He signed the Federal Highway Act in 1956, which resulted in the opening of the first part of Interstate 94 in October of 1958 between Valley City and Jamestown.  The video clip also includes discussion of how the interstate highway project was funded, its value in national defense, and secondary road improvement projects.

Georgia's Oldest Business | Georgia Stories

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Think of how many different ways we get news and information today. The Internet, television, radio, letters, and conversations are just a few ways. In colonial Georgia, people were just as interested in the news as we are today, but they lacked convenient and fast ways of getting it. In fact, the king forbade Georgia colonists to publish a newspaper for the first 30 years of its existence. Instead, people relied on news from traveling visitors, friends, and through letters and newspapers from other places. Finally in 1763, an act of the legislature allowed publication of a newspaper. James Johnson, a printer from Scotland, was named the royal printer and the Georgia Gazette was born.

J. Alden Loring

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Loring, a naturalist, mammologist and author, had worked for U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, the Smithsonian Institute, and the Bureau of Biological Survey. In 1909 he embarked on an expedition to Africa with President Theodore Roosevelt to collect specimens for a new Natural History Museum.

Alexander Graham Bell | Scientist, Inventor, and Teacher Video

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Alexander Graham Bell devoted his life to helping people—deaf and hearing—communicate. Working tirelessly to integrate the deaf into society—like his pupil Helen Keller—Bell was also an avid inventor. He created numerous communication devices, including the telephone. Using a short video and two primary sources, students will learn about Bell’s inventions and his work with the deaf community.

View the Lesson Plan.

World War I: Legacy, Letters and Belgian War Lace | STEM in 30

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In this STEAM inspired STEM in 30, we will look at some of the technological advances of World War I that solidified the airplane’s legacy as a fighting machine. In conjunction with the Embassy of Belgium, we’ll also dive deep into how the war affected the lives of children in an occupied country and how lace makers helped feed a nation.

110: The Rise of Modern Georgia, Part I (Reconstruction and Growth) | Georgia Stories

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This episode tells the history of Georgia's culture from the Civil War onward. The first segment discusses the importance of trains to Atlanta both during and after the Civil War. The second segment tells the struggles of the Reconstruction era, with particular focus on the lives of sharecroppers. The final segment discusses Georgia music starting in the Civil War and the lasting impact the music of the south has had on American musical forms.

London: The Price of Traffic

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Learn how London's mayor has instituted policies that respond to the city’s growth while improving its livability and sustainability.

One-Handed Catch

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When he loses his hand in an accident at his family's butcher shop, eleven-year-old Norm, living in 1946 New York, works to find success at his first two loves--baseball and art.

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367 minutes
One-Handed Catch

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