Science

Illustrate Interdependence Within A MI Forest Ecosystem l MEECS Eco Bio Video Lesson 7

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Students use a ball of twine to create a forest ecosystem “web of life,” illustrating interdependence within a natural community and the importance of diversity within it. Students answer the following essential question as they investigate Michigan’s biodiversity and its importance: Why is biodiversity important? (This video lesson highlights activity 3 from lesson 6 of the Michigan Environmental Education Curriculum Support (MEECS) Ecosystems and Biodiversity Unit.)

 

MEECS Climate Change l Community Conversation: Video Lesson 9

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Students participate in a class-wide dialogue after conducting research on one of many Michigan personas about their views and solutions to climate change. (This video lesson highlights activities 3 and 4 from lesson 13 of the MEECS Climate Change Unit.)

Where Is All the Water in the World? l MEECS Water Quality: Video Lesson 2

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Students work together in groups to estimate the distribution of water in the various locations on Earth, where it is found, and discover how much fresh water is available on Earth for human use. Students answer these essential questions: Where is water found on Earth? Is there enough water on Earth for everyone? Why are the Great Lakes unique? (This video lesson highlights activity 5 from lesson 1 of the MEECS Water Quality Unit.)

Challenges of Teaching Biotechnology

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In this video interview created for Teachers' Domain Professional Development, high school teacher Diane Provenzano talks about the challenges of teaching biotechnology: keeping up with new scientific findings, techniques, and equipment; and fitting the topic into your mandated curriculum.

Launching a Unit on Electric Circuits

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In this video from Teaching Elementary Physical Science, watch how fourth-grade teacher Linda Block has her students surface prior knowledge before beginning a unit about the principles of electricity. Block describes beginning the unit with a questionnaire about familiar examples of electricity, then moves on to introduce the students to more complex content. In addition, she assesses their understanding of the content by having them create posters.

MEECS Energy Resources l Earth as an Apple: Video Lesson 10

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This lesson develops the concept of an ecological footprint through a demonstration with the Earth as an apple. (This video lesson highlights activities 1, 2 and 3 from lesson 8 of the MEECS Energy Resources Unit.)

MEECS Energy Resources l Hydro Power: Video Lesson 3

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Students will identify how hydroelectric facilities use water pressure to work. They will make a makeshift dam using common household materials to help them understand how the water pressure is harnessed to turn a turbine. They will discuss how water pressure, the flow of the water, and distance using gravitational force creates electricity.

MEECS Climate Change l Climate Change in the News: Video Lesson 10

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Students examine news sources and compare the type of coverage climate change receives as well as the objectivity of the sources. (This video lesson highlights activities 4 and 5 from lesson 14 of the MEECS Climate Change Unit.)

Toxic Tag l MEECS Water Quality: Video Lesson 10

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Students investigate aquatic food chains in the Great Lakes and how some contaminants can bioaccumulate in Great Lakes and inland lake fish through participation in a game called Toxic Tag. (This video lesson highlights activity 5 from lesson 9 of the MEECS Water Quality Unit.)

 

Teaching Planetary Sciences - Eclipses

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This is the third in a series of three professional development videos that correspond to lessons taught by Andrew Cloud, an Earth and Planetary Sciences teacher. Andrew’s class, a mixture of 9th and 10th graders, is an inclusion classroom he co-teaches with Barbara Brochstein.

In this lesson, Andrew introduces the concept of eclipses. He asks for student volunteers to represent the Sun (holding a flashlight), the Earth, and the Moon. He then asks the class to think about the order in which the volunteers should be assembled to create the conditions for a lunar eclipse to occur. The demonstration was reinforced by the use of the “Lunar Eclipse Essentials” video. In a final activity, students drew diagrams to illustrate a Lunar Eclipse and a Solar Eclipse.

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