Technology

Is Piracy Helping Game of Thrones? | PBS Idea Channel

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If you're like us, you love watching Game of Thrones, but you may not have cable. In this case, how are we watching this amazing show on HBO, which is stuck behind a pay wall? A huge number of viewers are downloading the show illegally. But, despite being the most pirated show of 2012, the Game of Thrones DVDs are top sellers, breaking HBO's own sales records! Could it be that piracy is actually helping the show? 

Career Connections | Transportation Supervisor

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Hear from a transportation supervisor of a company that relies heavily on vehicle use in its day-to-day operations. Learn about this career that involves maximizing operational efficiency while minimizing costs

Old Red Trail | Construction Changes

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Early road construction was time-consuming and expensive.  In 1959, road crews could lay out one mile of road a day at best. With today’s technology and equipment, paving and grading roads is much easier and faster.  Construction of bridges required specialists who could design the river-spanning lengths.  In the 1960s, road construction cost $400,000 per mile of four-lane highway, including the cost of land, equipment, workers’ pay, bridges, and materials.  Today, roads cost more than four times that for two lanes in one direction, but they last 50% longer

Are There Internet Dialects? | PBS Idea Channel

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We consider ourselves natives of Internetland, which has made us wonder if there's such a thing as an internet dialect. Is there a common way of communicating through word choice, vocabulary, and how these words are arranged and used? So what is Standard Internet Speak? Acronyms, emoticons, and hashtags? Purposeful misspellings and abbreviations? 

Does Pop Culture Need To Be "Popular"? | PBS Idea Channel

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What is "Popular Culture?" Despite what the term may lead you to think, it is not just media that is numerically popular! Tom Waits most certainly is part of popular culture, regardless of his lack of billboard hits. So what are the qualifications for "Pop Culture?" And where does the internet come into play in all this? 

Generation Like: You Are What You "Like"

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Learn about the evolution of digital media from an industry that sought out teens to one in which teens seek out content to “like” in this video from FRONTLINE: Generation Like. As school-aged children spend more time in digital spaces, companies are able to use information that they gather from their activities. This is different from how it once was. In 2001, corporations chased kids down and tried to sell cool teen culture back to them. Today, teens tell the world what they think is cool using the social currency of their generation: likes, follows, friends, and retweets. When kids like something online, it becomes part of the identity that they broadcast to the world. This resource is part of the FRONTLINE Collection.

Play the Game (Odd Squad) | Teaching Tips

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A 1st grade teacher guides her class through a practice game of “Blob Chase,” instructing students to use mathematical strategies, such as estimation, to visualize solutions to the game. Concept maps and sentence strips are used to support the use of mathematical language.

How Does Glitchy Art Show Us Broken Is Beautiful? | PBS Idea Channel

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You may have noticed "glitches," where people purposely push machines to malfunction and therefore create fascinating "mistakes." Instead of being frustrated and disdainful of these errors as we usually do when our technology fails mid-workflow, we find them to be bizarrely beautiful. Why are we so interested in these images, music, or objects that are structurally or formally broken? 

How Could 3D Printed Guns Affect Gun Laws? | Above the Noise

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In the United States, the gun debate has been raging for decades. Gun rights advocates think there are enough -- or maybe too many -- laws restricting their second amendment right to bear arms. Those wanting more gun control believe that to protect people’s safety, we need the government to regulate who can have a gun. But what happens when technology is one step ahead of the laws? That’s the case with 3-D printed guns. It’s always been legal for adults to make their own guns at home, but traditionally, that required specialized tools and a lot of skill. 3-D printing, however, is changing that, making it significantly easier to make a gun from scratch. This has sparked both interest from gun enthusiasts and concerns about public safety. Host Shirin Ghaffary explores how 3-D printed guns are affecting the gun debate in the United States.

Career Connections | Industrial Hygienist

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Industrial hygienists are specialists in the field of occupational health and safety. They analyze health hazards in the workplace.

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