Tobacco

Prevention and Fairness Doctrine | Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies

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Anti-Tobacco ads began running in the late 1960s under the Fairness Doctrine. The fight against cancer turns towards prevention, which opens new doors in combating the disease. Now, rather than a issue of biology and medicine, it became an issue of psychology and advertising.

Cigarette Infographic | Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies

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This video infographic charts the decline of smoking though the decades, from the last smoking advertisement in 1971 through to the 1980s and 1990s, when awareness of the link between smoking and cancer continued to grow in the public eye.

Introduction to the Smoking Section

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New York Voices looks at the battle over fresh air in bars and restaurants. For reasons concerning public health, states all over the country are beginning to ban smoking in public places. For example, in 2003, New York State became the third state to stamp out cigarette smoking in virtually all businesses. Legislation ended smoking in certain restaurants, bars and other public places. Smokers describe when they began to smoke and why, how they feel about smoking and how they are viewed as smokers by others. Learn more about the controversy regarding banning smoking in The Smoking Section, another video in this series.

Advertising Cigarettes | Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies

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The theory of chemical carcinogenesis, and the link between tobacco consumption and disease, was unknown for a large part of the 20th Century. Advertisements for tobacco skyrocketed after World War I, resulting in an unprecedented increase in lung cancer.

Scientific Proof | Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies

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It wasn't until the 1940s that scientists were finally able to prove the health hazards of smoking.

Tobacco, Advertising, and Cancer - Media Literacy Activities | Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies

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Media can be a powerful force in shaping perceptions about products and our own consumption habits. During the early to mid 20th Century, cigarette advertising was pervasive and the use of it was high. In the 1970s, a wave of anti-smoking advertising was released which ultimately changed the public’s perception and use of tobacco. The media encouraged people to smoke and when scientists proved that smoking was harmful the media in turn encouraged people to stop. In viewing these three clips from Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies, students will understand how media can influence the habits and attitudes of an audience.

Why Are Drugs So Hard to Quit?

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An animated video from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) which explains addiction in simple terms. Quitting drugs is hard because addiction is a brain disease. Your brain is like a control tower that sends out signals to direct your actions and choices. Addiction changes the signals in your brain and makes it hard to feel OK without the drug. Watch the video for a visualization of these concepts and for information on how to get yourself or a loved one help.

Why Is Vaping So Popular? | Above the Noise

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Smoking may be at near-record lows, but vaping remains popular. Among high school seniors, nearly than 1 in 3 admitted to using some type of vaping product. Vaping is the act of inhaling and exhaling the vapor produced by an e-cigarette or similar device. The term is used because e-cigarettes do not produce tobacco smoke, and instead produce a vapor that consists of fine particles. Find out why vaping is so popular and whether it is a healthier alternative to smoking cigarettes in the latest Above the Noise episode.

The Smoking Section

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States across the United States are beginning to ban smoking in public places to protect people from the hazards of second-hand smoke. This video segment from New York Voices looks at the battle over fresh air in bars and restaurants. Multiple perspectives are presented. Smokers debate it should be their choice to smoke or not smoke. Some resent being told they cannot smoke. On the other hand, nonsmokers are bothered by the smoke and risk the dangers of inhaling second-hand smoke.

Anyone Can Become Addicted to Drugs

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You might think that only some types of people can get addicted to drugs. The truth is, it can happen to anyone, whether you're young or old, rich or poor, male or female. This video from NIDA explains addiction in simple terms and offers a hotline to help you or a loved one find treatment.

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