Unemployment

Depression Era Hobo | Georgia Stories

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After the Civil War, many headed west in search of work, carrying a hoe with them. “Hoe boys” became “hobos.” Hobos were not "bums" or "tramps"; they were men seeking work wherever they could find it. They lived out of doors in camps known as "jungles". The dangers of travel by hopping trains crippled many. The outbreak of World War II brought enrollment in the armed forces to some hoboes and regular employment to others. Today the hobo's life on the road has entered the realm of national myth.

The Building Blocks of Macroeconomics | The Economics Classroom: Workshop 6

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Macroeconomics sets out to look at the entire economy as a whole, not just the pieces. The big ticket items like inflation, recession, unemployment, economic growth and gross domestic product (GDP) are the subjects of macroeconomics. This one-hour video workshop introduces students to the basic measurement tools of any economy.

How the Deck Is Stacked: The Recovery's Racial Divide

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Find out why, as of 2016, the wealth gap between black and white households in the United States is the largest it has been in three decades, even as the economy is recovering, in this video from FRONTLINE’s “How the Deck Is Stacked,” produced in collaboration with Marketplace and PBS NewsHour. Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal visits the town of Cleveland, Mississippi, to witness the recovery’s racial divide, a disparity that is seen in many cities and towns across the country. In Cleveland, the economic divide between white and black families is particularly acute. This resource is part of the FRONTLINE Collection.

Job Seekers Face Long Searches in Tough Economy

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As part of his ongoing series on "Making Sense" of the economy, NewsHour Economics Correspondent Paul Solman visits a Manhattan job fair where many people have been out of work for as long as a year.

The Overnighters | Sleeping at the Church

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"We have people literally walking up to our door from all over the world." - Pastor Jay

Chasing the American dream, thousands of workers flock to a North Dakota town where the oil business is booming. But instead of well-paying jobs, many find slim work prospects and a severe housing shortage. Pastor Jay Reinke converts his church into a makeshift dorm and counseling center, allowing hundreds of men, some with checkered pasts, to stay there despite the congregation's objections and neighbors' fears. The men become known as "overnighters," and community opposition to their presence soon reaches a boiling point. Filmmaker Jesse Moss unveils the human consequences of the oil boom in the documentary The Overnighters.

The Overnighters | The Problem

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At a town council meeting, commissioners consider a ban on RV parking.

Chasing the American dream, thousands of workers flock to a North Dakota town where the oil business is booming. But instead of well-paying jobs, many find slim work prospects and a severe housing shortage. Pastor Jay Reinke converts his church into a makeshift dorm and counseling center, allowing hundreds of men, some with checkered pasts, to stay there despite the congregation's objections and neighbors' fears. The men become known as "overnighters," and community opposition to their presence soon reaches a boiling point. Filmmaker Jesse Moss unveils the human consequences of the oil boom in the documentary The Overnighters.

The Overnighters | Life at Church

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Pastor Jay Reinke talks about his "overnighters" program.

Chasing the American dream, thousands of workers flock to a North Dakota town where the oil business is booming. But instead of well-paying jobs, many find slim work prospects and a severe housing shortage. Pastor Jay Reinke converts his church into a makeshift dorm and counseling center, allowing hundreds of men, some with checkered pasts, to stay there despite the congregation's objections and neighbors' fears. The men become known as "overnighters," and community opposition to their presence soon reaches a boiling point. Filmmaker Jesse Moss unveils the human consequences of the oil boom in the documentary The Overnighters.

The Overnighters | Church Members Object

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Overnighters act in ways that Shelly Schultz, a church member, considers disrespectful.

Chasing the American dream, thousands of workers flock to a North Dakota town where the oil business is booming. But instead of well-paying jobs, many find slim work prospects and a severe housing shortage. Pastor Jay Reinke converts his church into a makeshift dorm and counseling center, allowing hundreds of men, some with checkered pasts, to stay there despite the congregation's objections and neighbors' fears. The men become known as "overnighters," and community opposition to their presence soon reaches a boiling point. Filmmaker Jesse Moss unveils the human consequences of the oil boom in the documentary The Overnighters.

Unemployment Benefits in Jeopardy

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NewsHour Economics Correspondent Paul Solman explores what's behind the struggle to obtain unemployment benefits in Florida.

For Some, Finding Work Proves Extra Difficult

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NewsHour economics correspondent Paul Solman talks to laid-off business executives and ex convicts, two groups of people for whom job opportunities are especially slim in today's economic climate.

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