U.S. History

Strange Fruit: A Song Born of Protest

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This video segment explores how the song Strange Fruit became one of the best known and most enduring songs of protest. In 1939, the legendary blues singer Billie Holiday performed the song as a daring criticism of the commonplace practice of the lynching of African-Americans. Civil rights groups such as the NAACP had made countless appeals, but it was Holiday’s haunting rendition that made it impossible for white Americans and lawmakers to ignore the widespread crime.

Hajj: Part II | Religion & Ethics Newsweekly

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Over two million Muslims from around the world travel to Mecca each year for the Islamic pilgrimage known as Hajj. How does this experience change their lives? This video from Religion & Ethics Newsweekly follows American Muslim Abdul Alim Mubarak as he experiences Hajj for the first time.

Know Ohio | Ohio's Mounds and Earthworks

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Explore the mystery of ancient Indian earthworks and mounds in Ohio. No one quite knows when or why they were built. At Hopewell National Historic Park, modern-day archaeologists are still uncovering artifacts and looking for answers.

City of Gold: The Story of South Pass City | Mining Techniques and Hazards

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Learn about the techniques gold miners used to collect gold ore from the area around South Pass City, as well as the hazards they faced during the mining process. 

In the accompany lesson plan (found in the Support Materials), students will watch a video that explains the mining process and hazards, and then create caution signs to show their understanding of the challenges the miners faced. Finally, the students will take part in a collaborative STEM challenge to build a working hoist using a limited amount of supplies. 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: 

  • Students will develop grade level appropriate speaking and listening skills, as described by the standards. 
  • Students will understand how technology impacted the mining process of early gold miners, as well as the hazards the miners faced. 
  • Students will define a design problem and use limited resources to solve it. 

February 7, 2019 | News Quiz

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This episode features stories about the recent polar vortex, air pollution in Thailand, the dam collapse in Brazil, a mobile shop in Russia, a measles outbreak, sand art, Lunar New Year, Super Bowl LIII, and more. News Quiz is KET's weekly 15-minute current events program for students. The program consists of news segments, a current events quiz, opinion letters, and an Extra Credit report.

Answer this week's opinion question at the News Quiz website. You can also copy this week's quiz to use in Google Classroom.

The Bozeman Trail | Who Was Jim Bridger?

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Learn about the life and accomplishments of the famed mountain man, Jim Bridger, through this collection of videos, images, and activities.

Martha Washington, Letters from the General | In Their Own Words

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Mrs. Washington shares one of the letters she received from General Washington when they were separated during the Revolutionary War. While the signing of the Declaration of Independence brought great jubilation to the colonists, it also brought great concern to Mrs. Washington, who feared that the General would be captured and tried for high treason.

The Comanche and the Horse | Native America

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The image of American Indians on horseback is iconic, but indigenous populations didn’t actually encounter horses until the 15th century, when Europeans ironically brought them to America as weapons of conquest. The Comanche adopted the horse as an important ally to help protect their way of life. Comanche used the horse to hunt and for strength in battle, and on horseback Comanche were able to remain mobile enough to avoid the impact of European diseases. But in 1875 the U.S. began targeting these horses, which were by then integral to Comanche identity.

Despite the European conquest the Comanche are still here, with 15,000 members, and the spirit of the horse remains sacred.

Photo from Gus | Moon Memories

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Retired NASA engineer, John Tribe, tells a story about a memento the late Gus Grissom left behind. Astronaut Gus Grissom was one of three crew members who perished in the Apollo 1 fire.

Suicide Prevention: How Can Schools Help? | Above the Noise

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No one wants to talk about it, but suicide is a leading cause of death among teens. The good news is, schools are uniquely positioned to help. Student reporters from PBS NewsHour Student Reporting Labs investigate what schools can do. 

Have your students watch the video and respond to the question in KQED Learn.

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