Volcanoes

Geology | Science Trek

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Geology plays an essential part in our lives. Geologists help us with everyday things in our lives and they keep us safe by studying the land around us. Find out more in this geological adventure.

The Mystery of the Eocene’s Lethal Lake | Eons

Icon: 
Streaming icon

In 1800s, miners began working in exposed deposits of mud near the town of Messel, Germany. They were extracting oil from the rock and along with the oil, they found beautifully preserved fossils of animals from the Eocene Epoch. What happened to these Eocene animals? And why were their remains so exquisitely preserved?

Deep Ocean Volcanoes

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Learn about underwater volcanoes and the discovery of the erupting deep-ocean volcano West Mata with this video from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The video includes a visualization of the ocean floor as well as footage that captured the volcanic eruption. The West Mata volcano is part of a chain of volcanoes in the Pacific Ocean called the Ring of Fire.

To view the Background Essay and Teaching Tips for this video, go to Support Materials below. This resource was developed through WGBH’s Bringing the Universe to America’s Classrooms project, in collaboration with NASA. Click here for the full collection of resources.

Mount St. Helens Ecosystem Rebuilds 36 years After Volcanic Eruption | PBS NewsHour

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Watch how the ecosystem has changed since Mount St. Helens erupted with this video and educational resources from May 19, 2016.

GPS: Lava Flow

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This DragonflyTV segment follows two girls as they explore how plants grow back after being wiped out by lava flows at Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. They also learn to differentiate between pahoehoe and ‘a’a lava flows.

Nature | A Land Born in Fire

Icon: 
Streaming icon

In this Nature video, follow geologists as they retrieve samples from a fresh batch of Kilauea's molten lava.

Nature | Lava Landscapes

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This video from Nature describes the dramatic impact volcanic activity has on the Hawaiian landscape. An eruption often leaves behind a destroyed terrain, looking similar to the surface of the moon. To the casual observer, it would appear as through nothing had ever lived on the land. Scientists, however, can see a sketch of what was once there -- trees, lush forests, and large boulders. Within the lava’s destruction, new life also emerges.

The Grand Canyon: Its Youngest Rocks

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Discover a dramatic landscape created by relatively recent rock-forming activity in the Grand Canyon in this video from NOVA. Volcanic eruptions only a million years ago created the canyon's youngest rocks. In contrast with the much older Vishnu Schist formation, this younger rock has been much more susceptible to physical change. When three-hundred-meter (thousand-foot) lava dams periodically blocked the river, they were quickly eroded away and river flow restored. This video is available in both English and Spanish audio, along with corresponding closed captions.

St. Helens: Out of the Ash | The Volcanic Eruption of Mount St. Helens

Icon: 
Streaming icon

In May of 1980 Mount St. Helens grabbed the world’s attention by putting on a volcanic display never before witnessed in modern times. Today, it still fascinates millions. People from around the globe are drawn to the Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument. KSPS's St. Helens: Out of the Ash provides eyewitness accounts of the volcanic eruption at Moutn St. Helens and explores the effects of the eruption and the changes that have occurred to the mountain and its surrounding areas ever since. 

Teach students vocabulary related to volcanoes, the different types and features of volcanoes, and the geological and societal effects of volcanic eruptions with these video segments and accompanying learning gudie. Visit KSPS Education for additional educator resources.

Volcano Geochemistry: Windows to Earth's Interior | Smithsonian Science How

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Explore volcanoes as windows into the Earth's melted interior. Meet Dr. Elizabeth Cottrell, a geologist at the National Museum of Natural History. Understand how you are connected to the interior of the Earth through cycling of gases and other materials. Uncover the evidence about geologic events contained in volcanic glasses and other eruption products. Think about how plate tectonics have gotten us to where we are today on Earth.

Pages